R. L. Boyce, Lightnin Malcolm & Jimbo Mathus at Clarksdale’s Deep Blues Festival


Robert Palmer’s movie and book “Deep Blues” was instrumental in introducing the world to the Hill Country Blues style and its stars, R. L. Burnside and Junior Kimbrough, so it is totally appropriate that the annual Deep Blues Festival is held in Mississippi, in the holy pilgrimage site of blues known as Clarksdale. With events spanning a full weekend at two historic venues in the area, the Shack Up Inn and the New Roxy, the Deep Blues Festival is a great opportunity to hear some of the remaining greats of authentic Mississippi blues, and the generation of young musicians that have been influenced by them.
The New Roxy is the scene for most of the roots blues acts, and it is itself an amazing venue. Formerly a theatre in Clarksdale’s Black business district, known as the New World District, the Roxy had been abandoned and lost its roof many years ago. It was assumed that the building was doomed, but then the current owners acquired it, and rather than putting a new roof on it, conceived it as an outdoor courtyard and music venue. Restoring the front rooms has given the Roxy both indoor and outdoor space, and it has become a favorite location for live music in pleasant weather.
On the first night of the Deep Blues Festival, the New Roxy was packed with people. The Kimbrough Brothers, consisting of Robert, David and Kinney Kimbrough, three sons of the late Junior Kimbrough, were just coming off stage as we arrived. They were followed by an amazing all-star line-up of R. L. Boyce and his daughter Sherena, Lightnin Malcolm and T-Model Ford’s grandson Stud on the drums, which filled the dance floor up in front of the small indoor stage at the front of the venue. After them, Clarksdale native Jimbo Mathus appeared with his band on the big outdoor stage, performing songs primarily from his most recent release Dark Night of the Soul. We also briefly rode around to Levon’s Bar and Grill, where the Space Cowboy and his blues band were on stage.
There was also live music at the Shack Up Inn, the former Hopson Plantation to the south of Clarksdale along Highway 49, but the acts on that schedule leaned more toward rock, and we did not head out there. Altogether it was a fun night of blues and food.

Sean “Bad” Apple & R. L. Boyce at The Bin at Shacksdale Motel


It’s not at all unusual for Sean “Bad” Apple and R. L. Boyce to perform in Clarksdale, but on the last Saturday in February, they performed in a rather unusual place. The Bin is a former grain elevator used as a music venue on the grounds of the Shacksdale Motel ,a motel of cottages across the road from the Shack Up Inn at Hopson, just outside of Clarksdale. The motel and inn are popular with out-of-town visitors on blues pilgrimages, so live blues performances on the grounds make a lot of sense. Unfortunately, it was quite cold on this particular afternoon, and the venue was somewhat open to the outside. But a good crowd was present, including singer Libby Rae Watson, who was scheduled to perform after Apple and Boyce, who were aided by Stud Ford on drums and Sherena Boyce on tambourine. The afternoon consisted primarily of Boyce’s unique compositions, as well as some Hill Country standards like “Poor Black Mattie” and “Rollin’ and Tumblin’.” The fun continued until 5 PM, and then Boyce had to leave for another show elsewhere in the Delta.




Great Music Documentaries and Live Music at the Clarksdale Film Festival

1588 Delta Cinema, Clarksdale Film Festival1589 Sherena Boyce1590 Sean Bad Apple & Stud Ford1591 Sean Bad Apple1593 Stud Ford1595 Sean Bad Apple, Stud Ford & Sherena Boyce1596 Sean Bad Apple, Stud Ford & Sherena Boyce1597 Sean Bad Apple, Stud Ford & Sherena Boyce1598 Sean Bad Apple, Stud Ford & Sherena Boyce1599 Sean Bad Apple, Stud Ford & Sherena Boyce1600 Sean Bad Apple, Stud Ford & Sherena Boyce1601 Sean Bad Apple & Stud Ford1603 Stud Ford & Sherena Boyce1605 Sean Bad Apple, Stud Ford & Sherena Boyce1606 Sean Bad Apple, Stud Ford & Sherena Boyce1607 Sherena Boyce1608 Sherena Boyce1610 Sean Bad Apple1611 Sean Bad Apple & Stud Ford1612 Sean Bad Apple & Stud Ford1613 Leo Bud Welch1614 Leo Bud Welch1615 Leo Bud Welch1616 Leo Bud Welch1618 Leo Bud Welch1619 Leo Bud Welch1620 Leo Bud Welch1621 Leo Bud Welch1622 Leo Bud Welch1623 Leo Bud Welch1628 Sherena Boyce & Carla Robinson
The annual Clarksdale Film Festival is a rather unusual film festival. For one thing it is held in the Mississippi Delta city of Clarksdale, which is more known for blues music than for film. For another, the films it presents are almost all documentaries, and the majority of them are films about music. But all of this makes the Clarksdale Film Festival worth attending. Unfortunately, this year, the films I would have liked to have seen the most were shown on Friday afternoon, during times when both I and my girlfriend had to be at work. But we managed to make it down on Saturday to catch Bayou Maharajah, Lily Keber’s superb biography of New Orleans piano legend James Booker, and the world premiere of Late Blooming Bluesman, a documentary about the late discovery of 84-year-old bluesman Leo “Bud” Welch, whose debut album for Big Legal Mess Sabougla Voices shocked the world. Before the film, Clarksdale bluesman Sean “Bad” Apple performed with Stud Ford on drums, the nephew of the late T-Model Ford from Greenville, with juke joint dancer Sherena Boyce joining them. Then Leo performed a handful of tunes as well before the start of the film about him. Altogether it was a great final day of the film festival.

R. L. Boyce & Lightnin Malcolm Live at Antone’s

1392 Austin106 R. L. Boyce & Stud107 Stud & Lightnin108 R. L. Boyce109 Sherena & Lightnin111 Sherena & Lightnin112 Sherena & Lightnin113 R. L & Sherena Boyce114 R. L. Boyce115 Sherena, Stud & Malcolm116 R. L., Sherena, Studd & MalcolmJPG117 Sherena & Lightnin118 R. L., Studd, Lightnin & Sherena119 R. L., Stud, Lightnin & Sherena120 Sherena & Lightnin121 Antone's122 Lightnin Malcolm123 Antone's124 Antone's126 R. L., Stud & Lightnin127 Lightnin & Sherena128 R. L. & Stud129 Antone's Schedule130 Antone's Marquis131 Stud & Lightnin132 Sherena & Lightnin133 Sherena & Lightnin134 Sherena Boyce & Lightnin Malcolm135 R. L. & Friend136 R. L. Boyce137 R. L. Boyce138 Sherena Boyce1410 Sherena in Austin
When a young Lebanese man from Port Arthur, Texas named Clifford Antone got kicked out (or perhaps dropped out, depending on who you ask) of the University of Texas after a marijuana arrest in 1970, it seemed like an end to a promising career. The Antone family were prominent businessmen in Houston, owning an import firm and a chain of sandwich shops that specialized in po-boys. Other young men might have fallen into a depression, or started on a downward spiral into harder drugs and ruin, but Clifford Antone decided to open a night club. Yet when Antone’s opened in 1975 on a then-moribund East Sixth Street in downtown Austin, it was hardly the kind of club that people would have expected success from, for it was a blues club, and the blues revival had fizzled out by the end of the 1960’s. Nor was Austin well-known for blues, despite a Texas blues legacy that was primarily centered around Houston. But all of the best names in blues from around the country played at Antone’s, and by the time of Clifford Antone’s death in 2006, his empire had added a record store and a record label as well. The record store belongs to other owners now, and the record label was sold to Warner Brothers after a bankruptcy, but the club, despite occasional closures and numerous relocations, remains the absolute best blues club in Texas, and probably one of the best blues clubs in the world. So it was quite an honor for Hill Country bluesman R. L. Boyce to be invited to play there, along with Marshall County bluesman Lightnin’ Malcolm, who has increased in popularity over the last several years. The club was packed to overflowing, despite the cold, rainy weather, and the crowd enjoyed every minute of the proceedings. The drum chair was held by the late T-Model Ford’s grandson Stud Ford, and R. L.’s daughter Sherena provided the juke joint dancing and played the tambourine. Seen in the crowd was noted music journalist Matt Sonzala. It was a great night indeed.