Gravel Springs Block Party and Day 2 of the Otha Turner Picnic


The second day of the annual Otha Turner Picnic was much more crowded than the first, as crowds came out to hear such artists as R. L. Boyce, Kody Harrell, the French blues band Pin’s Downhome Blues, led by Pascal Pinede, and Robert Kimbrough Sr. In addition, of course, there were frequent performances by Sharde Thomas and the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band, occasionally joined by fife played Willie Hurt from the Hurt Family Fife and Drum Band near Sardis. This year’s picnic was free, and some had thought that this fact might cut down on the degree of informal partying along O. B. McClinton Road, but if anything, this year’s Gravel Springs Block Party was bigger than the last. Unfortunately, at about 11 PM, the police moved in to shut down the block party along the road. While enjoying breakfast at the Huddle House in Senatobia afterwards, I overheard that the reason for the police break-up of the block party had been a shoot-out that had occurred at LP’s Ball Field on Hunters Chapel Road between Como and Senatobia. Still, the trouble stayed far away from the annual picnic.







https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=0UzTXTsNiqs

The Hurt Family Celebrating The 4th of July With Fife and Drum


As I have discussed before in this blog, Black fife and drum music is an endangered form of pre-blues that probably played a role in the development of jazz as well as blues. Although the tradition persisted in some parts of Georgia and Tennessee into the 1980’s, it appears to be limited entirely to two families in two counties of Mississippi today. While Sharde Thomas, the granddaughter of Otha Turner, runs the best-known band, the Rising Stars, the Hurt and Burdett families in Panola County continue the tradition in a much more clandestine way. Their picnics, although open to the general public, usually consist of family members and friends, and are held on a remote hill on Burdett Road west of Sardis. Outside recognition of the Hurt family has been minimal, so much so that some writers have proclaimed the Rising Stars in nearby Tate County the only fife and drum band remaining, but the Hurt family holds their picnics generally twice a year, at the 4th of July and at Labor Day. The goal of fife and drum music is fairly simple- to set up trance-inducing drum patterns that motivate dancing. The bass drum beat is the motivator, with people in the crowd exhorting the drummer to “beat that thing” and the dancers going lower and lower to the ground with each beat. Although the fife would seem to be a mandatory part of the proceedings, occasionally at the Hurt picnics, only the drummers come out, and their repetitive grooves are punctuated by the yells of the dancers. As the drummers proceed across the picnic grounds, the event seems something like a rural version of a second-line.
For those wanting to experience Mississippi fife-and-drum music in its authentic settings, Sharde Thomas holds the Otha Turner Picnic each year, usually a week before Labor Day. It is held on O. B. McClinton Road in the Gravel Springs community of Tate County, east of Senatobia. The Hurt Family holds fife and drum picnics in the Mount Level community west of Sardis, generally on the July 4th weekend and again on Labor Day. The place is west of Sardis out Highway 315, right on Mount Level Road and left on Burdett Road. The picnic ground is on a hill.

A Bigger Crowd at Day 2 of the Otha Turner Picnic

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

Saturday is generally the biggest day of the Otha Turner Picnic each year, and this year was no exception, with a bigger crowd inside the gates, and a much bigger crowd at the informal block party outside the gates along O. B. McClinton Road as well. Although the police were stopping all cars coming and going on Highway 310 near the picnic, I was eventually able to make it to the grounds, arriving just before R. L. Boyce went on stage. Several other acts performed, including a decent blues/rock band called Mississippi Shakedown, with whom I was not familiar at all. But as always, Sharde Thomas and her Rising Star Fife and Drum Band were the stars of the show, marching through the crowd motivating a number of dancers, and even playing across the fence to the young people at the block party along the road. All too soon, the picnic came to an end for another year, but the block party was still in full swing along the road outside.





Preserving Endangered Traditions at Day 1 of the Otha Turner Picnic

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

In previous posts here at The Frontline, I have discussed the importance of Black fife-and-drum music, both as an African cultural survival among Blacks in America, and also as a form of pre-Blues music, part of the building blocks that came to make up the music we call blues. Despite growing publicity and efforts at preservation, the Black fife-and-drum tradition is remarkably fragile, existing primarily today only in two rural Mississippi counties, Tate and Panola. For those with an interest in this music, the primary event where it can be witnessed (for it is as much a visual spectacle as a musical form) is the annual Otha Turner Picnic, held in the remote community of Gravel Springs east of Senatobia, Mississippi. Usually held on Labor Day weekend, or occasionally the weekend before it, the Otha Turner Picnic began as a small family gathering at Otha’s house on the O. B. McClinton Road. Otha and other fife-and-drum musicians such as Napoleon Strickland, Sid Hemphill and R. L. Boyce were frequent participants, and some line-up of these men appeared at the first New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival in 1970, billed as the “Como Fife and Drum Band”. Over the years the picnic grew, and now run by Otha’s granddaughter Sharde Thomas, has become a two-day festival of blues (and occasionally rock) musicians, and a $5 admission is now charged. But there is still barbecued goat, unexpected appearances from musicians like Luther Dickinson of the North Mississippi All-stars, and of course, plenty of fife-and-drum music as the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band parades through the crowd between stage acts.This year’s first night featured such performers as Memphis blues/folk singer Moses Crouch, Hill Country blues/rock band the Eric Deaton Trio from Water Valley, Luther Dickinson from the North Mississippi All-Stars (whose drummer is Sharde Thomas), and Dr. David Evans, the eminent musicologist who is also a first-rate blues performer in the archaic styles of the 1920’s and 1930’s country blues. But it is the powerful, hypnotic drumming that sets the Otha Turner Picnic apart from other blues festivals, even those in the Hill Country of Mississippi. On such hallowed ground, the snare and bass drum patterns invoke trance, and the fife calls to remembrance an African past. Sharde Thomas amplifies the connection between Mississippi and Africa when she exchanges the fife for a djembe drum, which she plays with her drum squad. As the night gets later, dancers fill up the space near the drummers, some them exhorting the young men on the drums to “beat that thing”, and whooping with delight. Although the music is more raw and basic, the scene is reminiscent of a New Orleans second-line.
Outside the gate, another festival is in progress, a sort of Gravel Springs block party, full of young people, custom cars, motorcycles and rap music. If the atmosphere inside the gates is old-school, that outside is like a rural version of Freaknik. Although there are never any major problems, the young people’s festival makes coming and going to and from the picnic somewhat difficult. All the same, the Otha Turner Picnic is a must-see event for anyone interested in Black music and folklore.


















Day 2 of the Otha Turner Picnic at Gravel Springs

1790 Otha Turner Picnic1787 Along the Road1786 Along the Road1784 The Other Festival1782 Kenny Brown1781 Kenny Brown1780 The Como-Tions1778 Sharde Thomas1776 Full Moon1774 Stud & Lightning1772 David Evans1170 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band095 Lightning Malcolm094 Lightning Malcolm093 Lightning Malcolm092 Stud091 Lightning Malcolm090 Lightning Malcolm089 Lightning Malcolm088 Otha Turner Picnic087 Otha Turner Picnic086 Otha Turner Picnic085 Lightning Malcolm084 Lightning Malcolm083 Along the Road082 Along the Road081 Sharde Thomas080 Sharde Thomas079 Sharde Thomas078 Otha Turner Picnic077 The Other Festival075 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band074 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band073 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band072 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band071 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band070 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band069 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band068 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band067 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band066 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band065 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band064 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band063 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band062 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band061 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band060 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band059 Sharde Thomas058 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band057 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band056 Otha Turner Picnic055 Lightning Malcolm & Kenny Brown054 Otha Turner Picnic053 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm051 Sherena and Malcolm050 Otha Turner Picnic049 Kenny Brown048 Stud047 Kenny Brown046 Kenny Brown045 Kenny Brown044 Kenny Brown043 Kenny Brown041 Otha Turner Picnic040 The Como-Tions038 The Como-Tions037 The Como-Tions036 The Como-Tions035 The Como-Tions034 The Como-Tions033 The Como-Tions032 The Como-Tions031 The Como-Tions030 The Como-Tions029 The Como-Tions028 The Como-Tions027 The Como-Tions025 The Como-Tions024 The Como-Tions020 Stud & Lightning019 Lightning Malcolm018 Stud017 Stud016 Stud015 Stud014 Dr. David Evans013 Otha Turner Picnic012 Dr. David Evans011 Dr. David Evans009 Dr. David Evans008 Dr. David Evans007 Dr. David Evans006 Otha Turner Picnic005 Otha Turner Picnic004 Otha Turner Picnic003 Otha Turner Picnic
The second day of the annual Otha Turner Picnic in Gravel Springs near Senatobia always falls on a Saturday, and brings out a larger crowd. This year, there were performances by Dr. David Evans, the eminent musicologist from the University of Memphis, a new blues-rock band called the Como-Tions from Como, Mississippi, and Lightning Malcolm, as well as the periodic parades around the grounds with Sharde Thomas and the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band. On this Saturday night, the bass drum beat seemed more insistent and the dancers more exuberant and enthusiastic as the night progressed. In addition, there was a massive block party outside the gates along O. B. McClinton Road as literally hundreds of young people lined both sides of the highway, just hanging out. There was also supposed to be some sort of after-event at L.P.’s field on Hunters Chapel Road, but when I drove past there, I only saw a few cars, so I kept on rolling.










Preserving the Black Fife and Drum Tradition at Gravel Springs

001 O. B. McClinton Road002 Otha Turner's Place003 O. B. McClinton Road004 Otha Turner's Place005 Otha Turner Picnic006 Otha Turner's Place007 Otha Turner Picnic008 Otha Turner Picnic009 Otha Turner Picnic010 Otha's Place with a Bass Drum011 Otha Turner Picnic012 Otha Turner Picnic014 Moses Crouch015 Otha Turner Picnic016 Moses Crouch017 Otha Turner Picnic018 Moses Crouch019 Otha's Place020 Sharde Thomas and the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band022 Future Bass Drummer023 Blue Mother Tupelo024 Otha Turner Picnic025 Full Moon026 Blue Mother Tupelo030 Rising Star Fife & Drum Band031 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band033 Otha Turner Picnic034 Otha Turner Picnic035 Otha Turner Picnic036 Sherena and FriendJPG037 Otha Turner Picnic038 Otha Turner Picnic041 Lightning Malcolm042 Lightning Malcolm043 Lightning Malcolm044 Lightning Malcolm045 Lightning Malcolm046 Lightning Malcolm047 Lightning Malcolm048 Lightning Malcolm050 Lightning Malcolm051 Lightning Malcolm052 Lightning Malcolm053 Lightning Malcolm054 Greg Ayres Band055 Greg Ayres Band056 Greg Ayres Band057 Greg Ayres Band058 Greg Ayres Band059 Greg Ayres Band060 Greg Ayres Band061 Greg Ayres Band062 Greg Ayres Band063 Greg Ayres Band064 Greg Ayres Band065 Greg Ayres Band066 Greg Ayres Band067 Greg Ayres Band068 Greg Ayres Band1758 Hernando's Underground Cafe1760 Otha Turner Picnic1762 Moses Crouch1764 Otha Turner Picnic1767 Blue Mother Tupelo1763 Otha Turner Picnic1765 Sharde Thomas & the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band1766 Blue Mother Tupelo
For fans of the blues in Mississippi, the summer is somewhat framed by two major events, the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic in June, which celebrates the Hill Country blues tradition, and the Otha Turner Picnic at Gravel Springs near Senatobia, generally held in August on the weekend before Labor Day. But the latter event is all the more important because it celebrates a type of African-American music that is older than the blues, Black fife-and-drum music. Tate and Panola Counties have always been a center of the fife-and-drum style, and picnics were frequently held on the Fourth of July and Labor Day. Fife master Otha Turner became famous for his pre-Labor Day picnic featuring fife and drum music and barbecued goat. Upon his death, the picnic tradition and the music tradition were continued by his granddaughter Sharde Thomas, who has kept the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band together and who remains an advocate for this endangered form of Black music. Under her administration, the picnic, held at the Otha Turner homestead in Gravel Springs near Senatobia, has become a two-day festival of many different artists and styles of music, including bands like Blue Mother Tupelo and the North Mississippi All-Stars, to solo artists like Dr. David Evans or Lightning Malcolm. There’s plenty of good fun and good food, and several processions of the fife and drum band across the grounds each evening. As the night progresses, the dancers become more exuberant, getting low to the ground and shaking in time with the beat of the bass drum, and the scene is reminiscent of other similar processions in African cultures, including New Orleans second-lines, and Haitian raras in Miami. On this year’s first night, there was also a brilliant full moon which threw a strange light on the proceedings. As in previous years, the festival inside the gates lead to another festival outside the gates, in which young people from the rural community parked and gathered along O. B. McClinton Road, listening to music and hanging out.










Blue Mother Tupelo and Sharde Thomas and the Boys perform at the Otha Turner Picnic at Gravel Springs, Mississippi, August 27, 2011

Blue Mother Tupelo and Sharde Thomas and the Boys perform at the Otha Turner Picnic at Gravel Springs, Mississippi, August 27, 2011