Celebrating the Legacy of Junior Kimbrough in Holly Springs


Marshall County, Mississippi is recognized as the home of the Hill Country blues, and the home of its two greatest exponents, Junior Kimbrough and R. L. Burnside. So it was entirely fitting that this year, one of Junior’s sons, Robert Kimbrough, put together an event to celebrate the life and legacy of his father, the Kimbrough Cotton Patch Blues Festival. Over several days, the event featured an exhibition of photographs at Rust College in Holly Springs, a guitar workshop, a jam session and a Sunday afternoon concert on an outdoor stage adjacent to the old VFW Hut on West Valley Avenue. On Mother’s Day afternoon, with impeccable weather, a crowd gathered to enjoy authentic Hill Country blues from Robert Kimbrough Sr. and the Blues Connection, Little Joe Ayers (who had played with Junior), Dan Russell, Memphis Gold, Cameron Kimbrough, Leo Bud Welch, R. L. Boyce with Carlos Elliot Jr and Lightnin Malcolm, and the Kimbrough Brothers, featuring Robert, Kinney and David Kimbrough. Young drummer and guitarist Cameron Kimbrough is a grandson of Junior and son of drummer Kinney Kimbrough, and was especially impressive on drums with Memphis Gold and Leo Bud Welch. Altogether, it was an amazing day of some of the best blues Mississippi has to offer.










A Reunion of Hill Country Greats at Foxfire Blues Festival


After a debut festival last year in March, this year the Foxfire Blues Festival moved to April, and one of the highlights of this year’s event was the reunion of Lightnin Malcolm and Cedric Burnside, two Hill Country blues musicians that began their careers together, but ended up going their separate ways, Cedric into the highly successful Cedric Burnside Project with Trenton Ayers, son of the Hill Country guitarist Little Joe Ayers. Both musicians were in rare form, and they seemed to enjoy the collaboration, each including songs from their old career together, as well as songs from their solo careers since. As both men play guitar and drums, it was easy for them to switch instruments for each other, and the results were magical. The Foxfire Blues Festival kicks off the blues season at Foxfire Ranch, which is located on Old Oxford Road just outside the small village of Waterford, Mississippi in Marshall County on Highway 7. From April until probably September, live blues will be held at the Hill Country Blues Pavilion on Sundays from 5-10 PM. Admission is usually $10, and worth every penny of it.




Day 2 of the R. L. Burnside Memorial Jam

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

My girlfriend and I had planned on going to see Cameron Kimbrough, who we thought was playing in Helena, Arkansas, but it ultimately turned out that he was playing in Warren, Arkansas instead, which is a three-hour drive. There was no chance of making it there before he went on stage, so we had dinner at the Holiday Lodge on Sardis Lake at Harmontown and then headed to the Blues Shack for the second day of the R. L. Burnside Memorial Jam. Holly Springs bluesman Little Joe Ayers was on stage when we arrived, playing to a crowd that was somewhat larger than the one on Friday night. After Joe performed, then Duwayne Burnside and Kenny Brown got on stage and performed such Hill Country classics as “All Night Long” and “Meet Me in the City.” Although we were having a great time there, we ultimately cut it short because my girlfriend wanted to catch Cedric Burnside, who was playing at Proud Larry’s in Oxford, so we left out and headed down that way.



Honoring the Legacy of R. L. Burnside at the Blues Shack

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

Duwayne Burnside, son of the late R. L. Burnside, is one of the best guitar players in the country, and in September each year, he sponsors the R. L. Burnside Memorial Jam at the Blues Shack, which is out in the middle of nowhere off of Highway 310 and Old Oxford Road near Waterford, Mississippi. Don’t be expecting a big formal festival like the Hill Country Picnic. Instead, you pay your $10 entry fee at a gate on a gravel driveway and come to a small wooden stage in front of a mobile home. The pleasant smell of barbecue smoke from an oil drum drifts through the air, and a small crowd is mesmerized by such musicians as Duwayne Burnside, Kenny Brown, Garry Burnside and Little Joe Ayers, in a more intimate setting where the line between performers and fans is non-existent. Duwayne might come down off the stage for a break and sit at your picnic table, or he might be behind the food stand pouring beers or fixing food plates. With plenty of children running around and having fun, it feels more like being invited to a house party than a festival. And that is an experience not to be missed.

Blues In The Alley At A Crossroads?

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

Marshall County, Mississippi and its county seat of Holly Springs are ground zero when it comes to the subgenre known as Hill Country blues. After all, the style’s two greatest stars, Junior Kimbrough and R. L. Burnside were from the county, and largely pursued their music careers there for the better part of their lives. As such, there is potential for blues tourism in Holly Springs, and the powers that be there have been slowly attempting to capitalize on it, sponsoring a weekly summer event during the months of July and August on Thursday nights called Blues in the Alley. On previous years, this event has showcased a lot of local and regional talent, including R. L. Burnside’s sons Duwayne and Garry, and Junior Kimbrough’s sons David and Robert, as well as Little Joe Ayers, and other blues musicians steeped in the Hill Country style. A stage is set up on the courthouse square, and on average, several hundred people show up to dance, party and enjoy the music.
Unfortunately, this year was different. When the event kicked off on June 30, Potts Camp legend Kenny Brown was on stage, and he had invited his friend Duwayne Burnside to perform as well.A crowd of several hundred people turned out to enjoy the kickoff, which was capped by a fireworks display. A week or two later, Lightning Malcolm, also familiar to Hill Country fans was the featured artist. But sadly, that was as good as it would get this year. As the summer stretched on, it became apparent that the festival organizers did not intend to book Duwayne or Garry Burnside (Duwayne ultimately appeared at Foxfire), nor Cedric Burnside (who played at New Albany’s Park on the River on July 2), nor David or Robert Kimbrough (Robert played a Sunday evening at Foxfire later in the summer), nor Little Joe Ayers. In fact, as the festival booked unknown bands like the Around The Corner Band, and out-of-town groups like the Juke Joint Three, something even more disturbing became apparent. For the most part, this year’s Blues In The Alley was booking only white artists. In fact, by the time the festival ended on September 1 with Gerod Rayborn, as best I could determine, only two Black artists had been featured all summer, and one of them, Oxford’s Cassie Bonner, is a singer/songwriter and not a blues artist at all. Ultimately, the programming choices affected attendance, which was way down, and skewed the crowds that did show up racially, with far fewer Blacks choosing to attend the weekly event. And this was all the more noticeable, as Holly Springs and Marshall County have a large Black majority. Sadly, it seems there is no way this was coincidental. Local Marshall County artists that are world-famous were passed over in favor of unknown (but white) bands from somewhere else. Although I asked a number of my friends in Holly Springs if they had heard any reason for the drastic change in booking policy, no justification for the change was ever readily forthcoming.
Ultimately, if Holly Springs wants to capitalize on its blues legacy as Clarksdale has managed to do, it must choose to become far less race-conscious as a town. The organizers of Blues in the Alley must understand that the Kimbrough and Burnside names are known all over the world, and that these are the artists that need to be booked if the goal is to get people to visit Holly Springs from other states or other countries. There’s nothing wrong with booking highly-talented white blues artists with impeccable Hill Country credentials like Lightning Malcolm, Kenny Brown or Eric Deaton. But Holly Springs and Marshall County are predominantly-Black, and Blues in the Alley should offer something for the Black majority as well…particularly if public funds are being expended. Otherwise, there may eventually not be a Blues in the Alley at all.

Cadillac Funk and Cedric Burnside At The Levitt AMP Summer Music Series in New Albany

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

The Levitt Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting live music opportunities in America, especially outdoor performances. Well-known to Memphians as the organization that helped save the Overton Park Shell, the foundation runs shells and other outdoor stages in a number of American cities, and sets up summer concert series in many more. This year, the Levitt Foundation announced a Summer Music Series in New Albany, Mississippi, taking advantage of the city’s recently renovated Park Along The River (the river in question being the Tallahatchie). On July 2, the series brought the Hill Country blues to New Albany with performances by Oxford-based Cadillac Funk, and then the Cedric Burnside Project, featuring Trenton Ayers (son of Little Joe Ayers) on guitar. A fairly large crowd showed up for the two-hours-worth of funk and blues, with dancers filling up the space in front of the stage. As is his custom, Cedric started his set out with several acoustic guitar songs before moving to the drums and inviting Trenton Ayers to join him. In its more hardcore, electric form, the Cedric Burnside Project performs a large repertoire, from originals that feature a Hill Country edge, to many of the songs made famous by Junior Kimbrough and Cedric’s grandfather, the late R. L. Burnside, such as “Firemen Ring The Bell” and “Goin’ Down South.” All too soon, the show was over, and the crowd was left asking for more.


Celebrating Hill Country Blues at Foxfire Ranch

047 Foxfire049 Welcome To Foxfire Ranch050 The Blues Pavilion at Foxfire054 Heavy Suga and the Sweet Tones055 Sweet Tones Drummer058 Foxfire Blues Festival062 Leo Bud Welch071 Little Joe Ayers074 Bill Howl-N-Madd Perry077 Duwayne Burnside079 Bill Howl-N-Madd Perry082 Foxfire Blues Fest084 Sherena Boyce089 JJ093 Duwayne Burnside098 Duwayne Burnside and Kenny Brown101 Duwayne Burnside106 Sherena Boyce108 Sherena Boyce111 Kenny Brown114 Duwayne Burnside118 JJ117 JJ121 Foxfire Blues Fest122 Foxfire Blues Fest126 Kingfish Ingram128 Foxfire Blues Fest131 Lightning Malcolm
Fans of the unique Mississippi style of blues known as Hill Country blues are of course very familiar with Marshall County, as it was the home of both Junior Kimbrough and R. L. Burnside, arguably the two most important Hill Country bluesmen. And they are probably also familiar with the Foxfire Ranch at Waterford in Marshall County, where a superb summer schedule of live blues occurs nearly every Sunday at 5 PM, under a shelter known as the Hill Country Pavilion. But this year, the Hollowell family, which owns the ranch, decided to sponsor an all-day concert of blues, and somewhat surprisingly, chose to do it in March, which is slightly earlier than the start-up of the festival season, which generally occurs in April.
Although the weather can be chilly and unpredictable in March, this year’s inaugural Foxfire Blues Festival was warm and pleasant, with plenty of sunshine. A large portable stage had been set up in the valley at the back of the large hill on which the pavilion stands, and a moderate crowd sat on blankets on the hillside, enjoying performances by Little Joe Ayers, Bill “Howl-N-Madd” Perry, Heavy Suga and the Sweet Tones, The Duwayne Burnside Band, Kenny Brown, Christone “Kingfish” Ingram and Lightning Malcolm. For a first-time festival, the event was fairly well-attended, it rolled smoothly, and the crowd enjoyed a beautiful day of great music.











Hill Country Blues in Benton County on a Very Hot Day

001 Ashland002 Willie Mitchell Marker003 Old Benton County Courthouse004 Arts Beats & Eats005 Ashland006 Ashland007 Ashland008 Ashland009 Old Benton County Courthouse010 Ashland011 El Rancho012 Hill Country Project013 Hill Country Project014 Snow Lake Building015 Ashland016 Ashland017 Ashland018 Old Benton County Courthouse019 Old Benton County Courthouse020 Ashland021 Old Benton County Courthouse022 Ashland023 Ashland024 Ashland025 Garry Burnside026 Ashland027 Ashland028 The Brooks Firm029 Our Club Constitution030 Ashland031 Ashland032 Ashland033 Ashland034 Sherena & Her Niece036 Garry Burnside037 Little Joe Ayers038 Garry Burnside039 Little Joe Ayers040 Ashland043 Garry Burnside044 Little Joe Ayers046 Mark "Muleman" Massey & Little Joe Ayers047 Mark "Muleman" Massey048 Little Joe Ayers049 Garry Burnside050 Mark "Muleman" Massey051 Mark "Muleman" Massey052 Mark "Muleman" Massey053 Mark "Muleman" Massey054 Mark "Muleman" Massey055 Mark "Muleman" Massey056 Mark "Muleman" Massey057 Ashland058 Mark "Muleman" Massey059 Mark "Muleman" Massey060 Ashland061 Ashland062 Ashland063 Ashland066 Mark "Muleman" Massey067 Ashland068 Mark "Muleman" Massey069 Old Benton County Courthouse070 Ashland071 Ashland072 Old Benton County Courthouse073 Old Benton County Courthouse074 Ashland076 Sherena077 Mark "Muleman" Massey078 Garry Burnside079 Mark "Muleman" Massey080 Mark "Muleman" Massey1601 Arts Beats & Eats1603 Old Benton County Courthouse1604 Garry Burnside1609 Little Joe Ayers & Garry Burnside1611 Little Joe Ayers1613 Mark "Muleman" Massey1616 Garry Burnside1619 Ashland
Just to the east of Marshall County, Mississippi is Benton County and its county seat of Ashland, which are also part of the Mississippi Hill Country. However, unlike Marshall County, Benton County is remote, and not as well-known, even though musicians like Nathan Beauregard and Willie Mitchell were originally from there. Sparsely populated indeed, Benton County has never been much of a destination, with the exception of visits from civil rights workers during the 1960’s. However, efforts are being made to preserve the history of Benton County, and toward that end, a festival called Arts, Beats & Eats was held on July 11th in Ashland, to attract people to the courthouse square, which has certainly seen better days. The Benton County Courthouse moved out of the historic structure on the square to a former manufacturing plant on Highway 370, and many businesses seem to have done the same. Worse, the extreme heat on Saturday kept crowds down to a minimum, with the exception of those who were running for office. But blues legends Little Joe Ayers and Garry Burnside were among the musicians who came out to perform with Mark “Muleman” Massey, and as the sun sank lower in the sky, the crowd increased and the temperature decreased. One of the purposes of the festival was to raise funds for the renovation and restoration of the square in Ashland, which is an extremely worthwhile goal. Here’s hoping this summer event becomes an annual thing. Blues belongs in Benton County as well as Marshall County.

Keep up with Mark “Muleman” Massey:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mark-Muleman-Massey/149276125153436






The Cassie Bonner Band on the Square in Holly Springs

001 Holly Springs002 Holly Springs003 Holly Springs004 Marshall County Courthouse005 Marshall County Courthouse006 Holly Springs007 Marshall County Courthouse009 Holly Springs010 Holly Springs011 Marshall County Courthouse012 Aikei Pro's Record Shop013 Holly Springs014 Holly Springs015 Holly Springs016 Hill Country Blues017 Holly Springs018 Holly Springs019 Holly Springs020 Holly Springs021 Holly Springs022 Holly Springs023 Holly Springs024 Holly Springs025 Holly Springs026 Holly Springs027 Holly Springs028 Cassie Bonner Band030 Holly Springs031 Holly Springs032 Holly Springs033 Holly Springs034 Holly Springs036 Holly Springs038 Cassie Bonner's Drummer039 Cassie Bonner's Drummer042 Cassie Bonner's Drummer043 Cassie Bonner Band044 Cassie Bonner Band045 Cassie Bonner046 Cassie Bonner Band047 Cassie Bonner Band048 Cassie Bonner049 Holly Springs051 Wobble, Baby, Wobble052 Wobble, Baby, Wobble053 Cassie Bonner Band054 Holly Springs055 Holly Springs056 Cassie Bonner Band057 Holly Springs058 Holly Springs059 Holly Springs060 Highway 7 & 4061 Holly Springs063 Little Joe Ayers065 Holly Springs066 Holly Springs067 Holly Springs068 Cassie Bonner Band069 Cassie Bonner Band070 Cassie Bonner Band071 Cassie Bonner Band072 Cassie Bonner Band073 Cassie Bonner Band074 Holly Springs075 Cassie Bonner Band076 Cassie Bonner Band077 Cassie Bonner Band078 Cassie Bonner Band079 Cassie Bonner Band080 Cassie Bonner Band084 Holly Springs086 Holly Springs087 Holly Springs088 Holly Springs089 Cassie Bonner Band090 Cassie Bonner Band091 Cassie Bonner Band092 Cassie Bonner Band093 Cassie Bonner Band094 Cassie Bonner Band095 Cassie Bonner Band097 Holly Springs098 Holly Springs099 Future Attractions1565 The Smiling Phoenix1568 Holly Springs1570 JB's On The Square1572 Holly Springs1574 Holly Springs1575 Marshall County Courthouse1576 Marshall County Courthouse1578 Holly Springs1579 Cassie Bonner Band1581 Cassie Bonner's Drummer1583 Cassie Bonner Band1585 Wobble, Baby, Wobble1587 Cassie Bonner Band1589 Cassie Bonner Band1591 Holly Springs1592 Holly Springs1596 Cassie Bonner Band1599 Cassie Bonner Band
Although the Delta of Mississippi is known as “The Land Where Blues Began”, the area to the east known as the Hill Country produced a unique style of blues that has become famous around the world. This subgenre of blues was especially prevalent in Marshall and Benton Counties, so it’s not surprising that Holly Springs, the county seat of Marshall County, is a town that emphasizes its blues heritage. The county was home to Junior Kimbrough and R. L. Burnside, and each Thursday night during the summer, Holly Springs sponsors a weekly live music concert called Blues in the Alley, which is held directly on the courthouse square. On July 9, the featured artist was the Cassie Bonner Band, a group from Oxford that I was not familiar with. Cassie Bonner proved to be a keyboard player and a singer, and while the group’s style was more neb-soul than blues, I was quite impressed with them, particularly the young drummer. There were also food vendors and a DJ, and a crowd of several hundred people, as well as a number of motorcyclists, and a camera crew filming a documentary about Holly Springs and David Caldwell, the owner of Aikei Pro’s Record Shop. I also ran into Hill Country Blues legend Little Joe Ayers on the square as well.

Keep up with Cassie Bonner:
https://www.facebook.com/cassie.bonner.9
https://www.facebook.com/cassie.bonner.33

https://myspace.com/cassiebonnersoul








Red White & Blues: Celebrating the Fourth With R. L. Boyce in North Mississippi

004 Al Reed Band005 Al Reed Band006 Al Reed Band007 Al Reed Band008 Al Reed Band009 Young Drummer010 Young Drummer011 Al Reed Band012 Young Drummer013 Al Reed Band014 Young Drummer016 Little Joe Ayers017 R. L. Boyce and Friend018 Al Reed Band019 Al Reed Band020 Al Reed Band021 A. C Reed Band022 R. L. Boyce023 R. L. Boyce and Al Reed024 R. L. Boyce028 Al Reed Band029 R. L. Boyce030 Al Reed Band031 Al Reed Band032 Al Reed Band033 R. L. Boyce & The Al Reed Band034 R. L. Boyce & Al Reed035 R. L. Boyce & Little Joe Ayers036 Little Joe Ayers037 Little Joe Ayers040 Little Joe Ayers041 R. L. Boyce042 Al Reed Band043 Al Reed Band044 Al Reed Band045 R. L Boyce with Greg Ayers Band048 R. L. Boyce & Greg Ayers Band049 R. L. Boyce050 Greg Ayers Band051 R. L. Boyce with Greg Ayers Band052 Greg Ayers' Drummer053 R. L. Boyce054 Greg Ayers' Bassist055 R. L. Boyce & Greg Ayers Band058 Greg Ayers059 Greg Ayers060 Sherena061 Sherena062 Sherena

Since blues is one of the unique genres of music invented in America, I can think of few better ways to spend the Fourth of July than at a blues picnic. While there weren’t many public blues events in the Mid-South advertised on the Fourth, I had been invited to a private picnic in Sardis, Mississippi where R. L. Boyce from Como and Little Joe Ayers from Holly Springs were performing with a band fronted by a harmonica player named Al Reed. The band was playing on a truck trailer that had been pulled into a residential yard on the west side of Sardis, and there was quite a crowd there, even a young blues fan who had come down from New York. The music was great, and kids from the neighborhood nearby were shooting off fireworks, but rains kept coming, and because the instruments were electric, the show kept getting interrupted. My friend and I decided to go to Batesville to dinner, and heading back through Como heard what sounded like a fife and drum band coming from a house near the intersection of Highway 310 and Highway 51. We pulled back around and in front of the house, but the sounds were apparently from a recording rather than an actual fife and drum band. Later, R. L. Boyce sat in with the Greg Ayers Band (Greg is apparently no kin to Little Joe) at a private event facility in Senatobia. This was more of a southern soul gig, but R. L. played a couple of Hill Country tunes, and the crowd was enthusiastic indeed.