Celebrating The Legacy of R. L. Burnside at Hernando’s Front Porch Jubilee

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

The Clifton Gin was a large building that loomed over the West End neighborhood of Hernando, Mississippi where many blues musicians lived and played their trade in nearby jukes. The Rev. Robert Wilkins, Gus Cannon and Jim Jackson all lived in the area for a time, and Mississippi Joe Callicott was from nearby Nesbit, Mississippi. Now each year, the city of Hernando commemorates that musical legacy with an event called the Front Porch Jubilee, held on the grounds of the historic gin, as part of Hernando’s larger Water Tower Festival. This year’s jubilee honored the legacy of the late R. L. Burnside, and members of the Burnside family were presented with a plaque. Performers included Jack Rowell and Triple Threat, Desoto County native Kenny Brown, who was mentored by both Joe Callicott and R. L. Burnside, Duwayne Burnside, Lightning Malcolm, rockabilly legend Travis Wammack, and R. L. Burnside’s grandson Cedric, performing with Trenton Ayers as the Cedric Burnside Project. In addition to the great music, there was a considerable amount of great food too, including some excellent pulled pork and the homemade ice cream from Senatobia-based Bliss. A warm afternoon turned to a chilly evening, but a stalwart crowd of about a hundred stayed to the end of Cedric’s last set. It was a great day of blues in Hernando.








Blues In The Alley At A Crossroads?

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

Marshall County, Mississippi and its county seat of Holly Springs are ground zero when it comes to the subgenre known as Hill Country blues. After all, the style’s two greatest stars, Junior Kimbrough and R. L. Burnside were from the county, and largely pursued their music careers there for the better part of their lives. As such, there is potential for blues tourism in Holly Springs, and the powers that be there have been slowly attempting to capitalize on it, sponsoring a weekly summer event during the months of July and August on Thursday nights called Blues in the Alley. On previous years, this event has showcased a lot of local and regional talent, including R. L. Burnside’s sons Duwayne and Garry, and Junior Kimbrough’s sons David and Robert, as well as Little Joe Ayers, and other blues musicians steeped in the Hill Country style. A stage is set up on the courthouse square, and on average, several hundred people show up to dance, party and enjoy the music.
Unfortunately, this year was different. When the event kicked off on June 30, Potts Camp legend Kenny Brown was on stage, and he had invited his friend Duwayne Burnside to perform as well.A crowd of several hundred people turned out to enjoy the kickoff, which was capped by a fireworks display. A week or two later, Lightning Malcolm, also familiar to Hill Country fans was the featured artist. But sadly, that was as good as it would get this year. As the summer stretched on, it became apparent that the festival organizers did not intend to book Duwayne or Garry Burnside (Duwayne ultimately appeared at Foxfire), nor Cedric Burnside (who played at New Albany’s Park on the River on July 2), nor David or Robert Kimbrough (Robert played a Sunday evening at Foxfire later in the summer), nor Little Joe Ayers. In fact, as the festival booked unknown bands like the Around The Corner Band, and out-of-town groups like the Juke Joint Three, something even more disturbing became apparent. For the most part, this year’s Blues In The Alley was booking only white artists. In fact, by the time the festival ended on September 1 with Gerod Rayborn, as best I could determine, only two Black artists had been featured all summer, and one of them, Oxford’s Cassie Bonner, is a singer/songwriter and not a blues artist at all. Ultimately, the programming choices affected attendance, which was way down, and skewed the crowds that did show up racially, with far fewer Blacks choosing to attend the weekly event. And this was all the more noticeable, as Holly Springs and Marshall County have a large Black majority. Sadly, it seems there is no way this was coincidental. Local Marshall County artists that are world-famous were passed over in favor of unknown (but white) bands from somewhere else. Although I asked a number of my friends in Holly Springs if they had heard any reason for the drastic change in booking policy, no justification for the change was ever readily forthcoming.
Ultimately, if Holly Springs wants to capitalize on its blues legacy as Clarksdale has managed to do, it must choose to become far less race-conscious as a town. The organizers of Blues in the Alley must understand that the Kimbrough and Burnside names are known all over the world, and that these are the artists that need to be booked if the goal is to get people to visit Holly Springs from other states or other countries. There’s nothing wrong with booking highly-talented white blues artists with impeccable Hill Country credentials like Lightning Malcolm, Kenny Brown or Eric Deaton. But Holly Springs and Marshall County are predominantly-Black, and Blues in the Alley should offer something for the Black majority as well…particularly if public funds are being expended. Otherwise, there may eventually not be a Blues in the Alley at all.

Lightning Malcolm Live at Cregeen’s in Jonesboro

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

Arkansas doesn’t have quite the blues scene that Mississippi has, and an Irish bar in Jonesboro wouldn’t exactly be the place one would expect to hear blues either. But in early June, Cregeen’s in Jonesboro hosted a performance by Hill Country bluesman Lightning Malcolm with T-Model Ford’s grandson Stud on drums, and this performance was interesting, in that Malcolm did a number of different tunes than the ones he usually plays at his shows. Despite the small upstairs stage and the lateness of the hour, the crowd was quite enthusiastic, and Cregeen’s also deserves a commendation for the excellent food on their late-night menu.

Crawfish and Hill Country Blues in Memphis’ Overton Square

189 Crawfish Festival191 Crawfish Festival192 Crawfish Festival193 Lafayette's194 Crawfish Festival195 Robata196 Crawfish Festival197 Crawfish Festival198 Bayou Bar and Grill199 Crawfish Festival200 Crawfish Festival201 Crawfish Festival202 Crawfish Festival204 Crawfish Festival206 Bayou Bar and Grill207 Crawfish Festival208 Crawfish Festival209 Sherena Boyce210 R. l. Boyce211 Crawfish Festival212 Crawfish Festival214 Crawfish Festival215 Crawfish Festival216 R. L. Boyce217 R. L. Boyce220 R. L. & Sherena Boyce223 Garry Burnside225 Lightning Malcolm228 Robert Kimbrough231 Robert Kimbrough232 JJ233 Robert Kimbrough Band234 Crawfish Festival236 Crawfish Festival237 Crawfish Festival238 Zakk & Big Papa Binns239 Crawfish Festival240 Bar Louie241 Crawfish Festival242 Crawfish Festival243 Crawfish Festival244 Crawfish Festival245 Crawfish Festival246 Crawfish Festival248 Garry Burnside250 Garry Burnside251 JJ253 JJ
Mention crawfish and most people will immediately think of Louisiana, but the “mudbug” is a popular sign of spring throughout the South, and Memphis is no exception. The Bluff City actually has two festivals in April dedicated to crawfish, and the first of these is the Overton Square Crawfish Festival, held in the city’s restored Overton Square entertainment district, mainly in the parking lot of the Bayou Bar and Grill. This year, in addition to plenty of beer and crawfish, the Overton Square festival featured a day of North Mississippi’s best blues musicians, including R. L. Boyce from Como, Robert Kimbrough and Garry Burnside from Holly Springs, and Lightning Malcolm. By the end of the afternoon, the crowd filled Madison Avenue for three straight blocks. It proved to be great food and great fun.



Celebrating Hill Country Blues at Foxfire Ranch

047 Foxfire049 Welcome To Foxfire Ranch050 The Blues Pavilion at Foxfire054 Heavy Suga and the Sweet Tones055 Sweet Tones Drummer058 Foxfire Blues Festival062 Leo Bud Welch071 Little Joe Ayers074 Bill Howl-N-Madd Perry077 Duwayne Burnside079 Bill Howl-N-Madd Perry082 Foxfire Blues Fest084 Sherena Boyce089 JJ093 Duwayne Burnside098 Duwayne Burnside and Kenny Brown101 Duwayne Burnside106 Sherena Boyce108 Sherena Boyce111 Kenny Brown114 Duwayne Burnside118 JJ117 JJ121 Foxfire Blues Fest122 Foxfire Blues Fest126 Kingfish Ingram128 Foxfire Blues Fest131 Lightning Malcolm
Fans of the unique Mississippi style of blues known as Hill Country blues are of course very familiar with Marshall County, as it was the home of both Junior Kimbrough and R. L. Burnside, arguably the two most important Hill Country bluesmen. And they are probably also familiar with the Foxfire Ranch at Waterford in Marshall County, where a superb summer schedule of live blues occurs nearly every Sunday at 5 PM, under a shelter known as the Hill Country Pavilion. But this year, the Hollowell family, which owns the ranch, decided to sponsor an all-day concert of blues, and somewhat surprisingly, chose to do it in March, which is slightly earlier than the start-up of the festival season, which generally occurs in April.
Although the weather can be chilly and unpredictable in March, this year’s inaugural Foxfire Blues Festival was warm and pleasant, with plenty of sunshine. A large portable stage had been set up in the valley at the back of the large hill on which the pavilion stands, and a moderate crowd sat on blankets on the hillside, enjoying performances by Little Joe Ayers, Bill “Howl-N-Madd” Perry, Heavy Suga and the Sweet Tones, The Duwayne Burnside Band, Kenny Brown, Christone “Kingfish” Ingram and Lightning Malcolm. For a first-time festival, the event was fairly well-attended, it rolled smoothly, and the crowd enjoyed a beautiful day of great music.











Kicking Off A New Year With Lightning Malcolm at Red’s

001 Lightning Malcolm002 Red's003 Red's004 Lightning Malcolm005 Lightning Malcolm & Sherena Boyce006 Lightning Malcolm007 Lightning Malcolm008 Sherena Boyce009 Red's010 Red's011 Lightning Malcolm012 Lightning Malcolm014 Sherena Boyce015 Lightning Malcolm016 Lightning Malcolm & Sherena Boyce017 Lightning Malcolm & Sherena Boyce018 Sherena BoyceJPG019 Sherena Boyce020 Lightning Malcolm021 Lightning Malcolm022 Red's023 Red's024 Red's025 Red's026 Lightning Malcolm027 Lightning Malcolm028 Red's029 Red's031 Lightning Malcolm032 Lightning Malcolm033 Red's034 Sherena Boyce035 Lightning Malcolm036 Lightning Malcolm & Sherena Boyce037 Sherena Boyce038 Lightning Malcolm039 Lightning Malcolm040 Red's041 Red's042 Red's043 Red's044 Red's2060 Red's2062 Lightning Malcolm2063 Lightning Malcolm & Sherena Boyce2064 Lightning Malcolm & Sherena Boyce
It may have been cold outside, but the new year got off to a hot start at Red’s Lounge in Clarksdale, Mississippi, with a live performance by Lightning Malcolm, one of the youngest generation of bluesmen who were mentored by R. L. Burnside and Junior Kimbrough and who help to preserve the unique Hill Country style of Mississippi blues. As for Red’s, it is really one of the last juke joints still functioning on a more-or-less regular basis, and one of the few places in the Delta where the state’s best blues artists appear frequently. The little lounge is routinely filled to the brim, as it was on this particular night as Malcolm treated the crowd to a mix of blues standards and material from his latest album Rough Out There. Not only was the club filled, but the dance floor as well.

Day 2 of the Otha Turner Picnic at Gravel Springs

1790 Otha Turner Picnic1787 Along the Road1786 Along the Road1784 The Other Festival1782 Kenny Brown1781 Kenny Brown1780 The Como-Tions1778 Sharde Thomas1776 Full Moon1774 Stud & Lightning1772 David Evans1170 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band095 Lightning Malcolm094 Lightning Malcolm093 Lightning Malcolm092 Stud091 Lightning Malcolm090 Lightning Malcolm089 Lightning Malcolm088 Otha Turner Picnic087 Otha Turner Picnic086 Otha Turner Picnic085 Lightning Malcolm084 Lightning Malcolm083 Along the Road082 Along the Road081 Sharde Thomas080 Sharde Thomas079 Sharde Thomas078 Otha Turner Picnic077 The Other Festival075 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band074 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band073 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band072 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band071 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band070 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band069 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band068 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band067 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band066 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band065 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band064 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band063 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band062 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band061 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band060 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band059 Sharde Thomas058 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band057 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band056 Otha Turner Picnic055 Lightning Malcolm & Kenny Brown054 Otha Turner Picnic053 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm051 Sherena and Malcolm050 Otha Turner Picnic049 Kenny Brown048 Stud047 Kenny Brown046 Kenny Brown045 Kenny Brown044 Kenny Brown043 Kenny Brown041 Otha Turner Picnic040 The Como-Tions038 The Como-Tions037 The Como-Tions036 The Como-Tions035 The Como-Tions034 The Como-Tions033 The Como-Tions032 The Como-Tions031 The Como-Tions030 The Como-Tions029 The Como-Tions028 The Como-Tions027 The Como-Tions025 The Como-Tions024 The Como-Tions020 Stud & Lightning019 Lightning Malcolm018 Stud017 Stud016 Stud015 Stud014 Dr. David Evans013 Otha Turner Picnic012 Dr. David Evans011 Dr. David Evans009 Dr. David Evans008 Dr. David Evans007 Dr. David Evans006 Otha Turner Picnic005 Otha Turner Picnic004 Otha Turner Picnic003 Otha Turner Picnic
The second day of the annual Otha Turner Picnic in Gravel Springs near Senatobia always falls on a Saturday, and brings out a larger crowd. This year, there were performances by Dr. David Evans, the eminent musicologist from the University of Memphis, a new blues-rock band called the Como-Tions from Como, Mississippi, and Lightning Malcolm, as well as the periodic parades around the grounds with Sharde Thomas and the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band. On this Saturday night, the bass drum beat seemed more insistent and the dancers more exuberant and enthusiastic as the night progressed. In addition, there was a massive block party outside the gates along O. B. McClinton Road as literally hundreds of young people lined both sides of the highway, just hanging out. There was also supposed to be some sort of after-event at L.P.’s field on Hunters Chapel Road, but when I drove past there, I only saw a few cars, so I kept on rolling.










Preserving the Black Fife and Drum Tradition at Gravel Springs

001 O. B. McClinton Road002 Otha Turner's Place003 O. B. McClinton Road004 Otha Turner's Place005 Otha Turner Picnic006 Otha Turner's Place007 Otha Turner Picnic008 Otha Turner Picnic009 Otha Turner Picnic010 Otha's Place with a Bass Drum011 Otha Turner Picnic012 Otha Turner Picnic014 Moses Crouch015 Otha Turner Picnic016 Moses Crouch017 Otha Turner Picnic018 Moses Crouch019 Otha's Place020 Sharde Thomas and the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band022 Future Bass Drummer023 Blue Mother Tupelo024 Otha Turner Picnic025 Full Moon026 Blue Mother Tupelo030 Rising Star Fife & Drum Band031 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band033 Otha Turner Picnic034 Otha Turner Picnic035 Otha Turner Picnic036 Sherena and FriendJPG037 Otha Turner Picnic038 Otha Turner Picnic041 Lightning Malcolm042 Lightning Malcolm043 Lightning Malcolm044 Lightning Malcolm045 Lightning Malcolm046 Lightning Malcolm047 Lightning Malcolm048 Lightning Malcolm050 Lightning Malcolm051 Lightning Malcolm052 Lightning Malcolm053 Lightning Malcolm054 Greg Ayres Band055 Greg Ayres Band056 Greg Ayres Band057 Greg Ayres Band058 Greg Ayres Band059 Greg Ayres Band060 Greg Ayres Band061 Greg Ayres Band062 Greg Ayres Band063 Greg Ayres Band064 Greg Ayres Band065 Greg Ayres Band066 Greg Ayres Band067 Greg Ayres Band068 Greg Ayres Band1758 Hernando's Underground Cafe1760 Otha Turner Picnic1762 Moses Crouch1764 Otha Turner Picnic1767 Blue Mother Tupelo1763 Otha Turner Picnic1765 Sharde Thomas & the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band1766 Blue Mother Tupelo
For fans of the blues in Mississippi, the summer is somewhat framed by two major events, the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic in June, which celebrates the Hill Country blues tradition, and the Otha Turner Picnic at Gravel Springs near Senatobia, generally held in August on the weekend before Labor Day. But the latter event is all the more important because it celebrates a type of African-American music that is older than the blues, Black fife-and-drum music. Tate and Panola Counties have always been a center of the fife-and-drum style, and picnics were frequently held on the Fourth of July and Labor Day. Fife master Otha Turner became famous for his pre-Labor Day picnic featuring fife and drum music and barbecued goat. Upon his death, the picnic tradition and the music tradition were continued by his granddaughter Sharde Thomas, who has kept the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band together and who remains an advocate for this endangered form of Black music. Under her administration, the picnic, held at the Otha Turner homestead in Gravel Springs near Senatobia, has become a two-day festival of many different artists and styles of music, including bands like Blue Mother Tupelo and the North Mississippi All-Stars, to solo artists like Dr. David Evans or Lightning Malcolm. There’s plenty of good fun and good food, and several processions of the fife and drum band across the grounds each evening. As the night progresses, the dancers become more exuberant, getting low to the ground and shaking in time with the beat of the bass drum, and the scene is reminiscent of other similar processions in African cultures, including New Orleans second-lines, and Haitian raras in Miami. On this year’s first night, there was also a brilliant full moon which threw a strange light on the proceedings. As in previous years, the festival inside the gates lead to another festival outside the gates, in which young people from the rural community parked and gathered along O. B. McClinton Road, listening to music and hanging out.










Celebrating the Life of B. B. King in Indianola

002 B. B. King Homecoming003 B. B. King Homecoming004 B. B King Homecoming005 Blues All-Stars006 Blues All-Stars007 Blues All-StarsJPG008 Blues All-Stars010 B. B. King Homecoming011 B. B. King Homecoming012 B. B. King Homecoming013 B. B. King Homecoming014 B. B. King Homecoming015 Blues All-Stars016 Blues All-Stars017 Blues All-Stars018 Cody Dickinson & Sherena Boyce019 B. B. King Homecoming020 Food Trucks021 Food Trucks022 Eden Brent023 Eden Brent024 Eden Brent025 Eden Brent026 B. B. King Homecoming029 Eden Brent030 Eden Brent031 B. B. King Homecoming032 B. B. King Homecoming033 Eden Brent034 B. B. King Homecoming035 Eden Brent036 Eden Brent037 B. B. King Homecoming038 Marquise Knox039 Marquise Knox041 Marquise Knox042 Marquise Knox043 Marquise Knox044 Marquise Knox045 Marquise Knox046 Marquise Knox047 Marquise Knox048 Marquise Knox049 Marquise Knox050 Marquise Knox051 Marquise Knox052 Marquise Knox054 Marquise Knox055 Marquise Knox056 Marquise Knox057 Marquise Knox058 Marquise Knox059 Marquise Knox061 Marquise Knox062 Marquise Knox065 Lil Ray066 Lil Ray067 Lil Ray068 Lil Ray069 Lil Ray070 Lil Ray071 Sherena Boyce & Marquise Knox072 Lil Ray073 Lil Ray074 B. B. King Homecoming078 The Blue Biscuit079 The Blue Biscuit082 Sherena Boyce085 North Mississippi All-Stars086 Lightning Malcolm087 North Mississippi All-Stars088 North Mississippi All-Stars089 Lightning Malcolm090 North Mississippi All-Stars091 North Mississippi All-Stars093 North Mississippi All-Stars094 North Mississippi All-Stars095 North Mississippi All-Stars096 North Mississippi All-Stars097 North Mississippi All-Stars098 North Mississippi All-Stars099 North Mississippi All-Stars100 North Mississippi All-Stars102 B. B. King Homecoming103 Cody Dickinson104 Cody Dickinson105 Cody Dickinson106 Cody Dickinson107 North Mississippi All-Stars108 North Mississippi All-Stars109 North Mississippi All-Stars110 North Mississippi All-Stars
Each year in B. B. King’s hometown of Indianola, Mississippi, deep in the historic Delta region, the great bluesman returned in late May for an event called the Homecoming, where he performed for the people of his original hometown, and on the occasion of the 2014 Homecoming, he stated that that year’s event would be his last. The old man’s health was fading, and the travel was hard on him. But none of us could have imagined that he would not live to see the next one. This year’s Homecoming, coming a week or so after B. B. King’s death, was a sad occasion, and yet an opportunity for many great blues musicians to come together and honor King’s life and legacy on the grounds of the museum that bears his name. Just as the occasion was both joyful and sorrowful, the day was alternated by periods of heat and sunshine and downpours of rain, but in between the showers came a diverse array of performers, including Greenville blues diva Eden Brent, youthful St. Louis blues star Marquise Knox, Lil Ray, son of the Louisiana blues star Raful Neal, and the North Mississippi All-Stars, with Cody and Luther Dickinson, featuring Sharde Thomas on the keyboards and fife, and Lightning Malcolm on the guitar. The crowd ebbed and flowed due to the weather, but at its strongest seemed to be about 200 or so, equipped with lawn chairs, blankets and picnic baskets, and even sparklers. The North Mississippi All-Stars had barely finished their outdoor set, when the rains came a final time, more decisively, and some of the crowd headed around to the Club Ebony for the indoor evening performance. There really couldn’t have been a better way to honor B. B. King.













Keep up with Eden Brent:
http://www.edenbrent.com
https://www.facebook.com/edenbrent
http://yellowdogrecords.com/eden/
https://edenbrent.bandcamp.com

Keep up with Marquise Knox:
http://marquiseknoxblues.com
https://www.facebook.com/marquise.knox
https://myspace.com/marquiseknox

Keep up with the North Mississippi All-Stars:
http://www.nmallstars.com
https://www.youtube.com/user/nmallstarsmusic
https://www.facebook.com/nmallstars

https://myspace.com/nmallstars
http://www.nmorecords.com

Joyce Jones, Kenny Brown, R. B. Stone and Destination Up at Foxfire Ranch

001 Joyce Jones & Friends002 Joyce Jones & Friends003 Hill Country Blues Pavilion004 Destination Up005 Destination Up006 Destination Up007 Destination Up008 Destination Up009 Destination UP010 Foxfire Ranch011 Hill Country Blues Pavilion012 Kenny Brown013 Joyce Jones & Friends014 R B Stone015 Kenny Brown016 Joyce Jones & Cameron Kimbrough017 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough & R. B. Stone018 Dancing019 R. B. Stone020 R. B. Stone & Joyce Jones021 Joyce Jones & Friends022 Kenny Brown & Joyce Jones023 Joyce Jones & Friends024 Kenny Brown, Joyce Jones & Cameron Kimbrough025 Joyce Jones026 Sherena Boyce027 Shaking The Tambourine028 Kenny Brown & Joyce Jones029 Joyce Jones030 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm031 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm032 Cameron Kimbrough033 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm034 Lightning Malcolm & Cameron Kimbrough035 Testing The Mic036 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm037 Kenny Brown, Lightning Malcolm & Cameron Kimbrough
On Mothers’ Day afternoon, I saw that Joyce Jones, whom I had seen at Sherena Boyce’s party in Como a month ago, would be performing at Foxfire Ranch in Waterford, Mississippi. The weather was warm and sunny, so I decided to drive down, but I got there about an hour after the gate opened. Joyce performed one song after I arrived, but then turned over the stage to a comedian, an evangelist, a Southern Soul artist with a song called “Pour It In A Cup”, and then a Christian rock band called Destination Up. The latter act was interesting, as the drummer was one of Joyce’s cousins, and although I’m not always a big fan of rock, they were really good musicians and I loved the uplifting message of their songs. Then Kenny Brown came back on stage, with Joyce Jones and a guest artist from Nashville named R. B. Stone and Cameron Kimbrough on drums. They did several traditional Hill Country blues songs, including the standard “Rolling & Tumbling” and “Old Black Man”, Joyce Jones’ variant of the standard “Coal Black Mattie” or “Old Black Mattie”. Then Lightning Malcolm came up to feature on a song as well. Although it wasn’t exactly what I expected, it ended up being a decent night of music under a full moon and starry sky.

Keep up with Joyce Jones here:
https://www.facebook.com/joyce.jones.5249349

Keep up with Destination Up here:
https://www.facebook.com/Destin8ionUp

Keep up with Foxfire Ranch here:
http://www.foxfireranch.com
https://www.facebook.com/foxfireranch2008