Celebrating The Legacy of the Mississippi Hill Country Blues at Waterford

Last year, the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic took a one-year hiatus, but most years, in June, a large two-day picnic is held at Betty Davis’ Ponderosa in Waterford, Mississippi to celebrate the past and current legends of the Hill Country style of blues.

Founded by Hill Country bluesman Kenny Brown, the event features performances from people like Duwayne, Garry and Joseph Burnside, Robert Kimbrough, Sharde Thomas and the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band and the Eric Deaton Trio. The weather is usually hot, but this year a fairly large crowd came out to enjoy the performers.

As the afternoon progressed however, dark clouds developed, and soon a fairly steady rain began over the festival grounds. As there was no shelter outside of the VIP areas, I decided it was time to go, as I didn’t have my camera bag, and my Nikon D3200 didn’t need to get exposed to water. I decided to head South to Oxford and get something to eat.

Endings and Beginnings With Duwayne Burnside at The Shelter on Van Buren

001 Duwayne Burnside002 Artwork003 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell004 Duwayne Burnside005 Kenny Brown006 Sherena Boyce007 Duwayne Burnside008 Duwayne Burnside009 Duwayne Burnside010 Duwayne Burnside011 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell012 Kenny Brown013 Duwayne Burnside014 Duwayne Burnside017 Duwayne Burnside018 Tonight Duwayne Burnside019 Duwayne Burnside020 Duwayne Burnside021 Duwayne Burnside022 Duwayne Burnside023 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell024 Kenny Brown025 Duwayne BurnsideJPG026 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell027 Kenny Brown028 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce029 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce030 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce031 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce032 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce034 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce035 Duwayne Burnside036 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce037 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell038 Duwayne Burnside039 Duwayne Burnside040 Duwayne Burnside041 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell042 Duwayne Burnside043 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell045 Kenny Brown046 Sherena Boyce047 R. L. Boyce & Duwayne Burnside048 R. L. Boyce & Kody Harrell049 R. L. Boyce050 R. L. Boyce052 R. L. Boyce053 R. L. Boyce & Kody Harrell054 R. L. Boyce055 R. L. Boyce056 Kenny Brown057 R. L. & Sherena Boyce058 R. L. & Sherena Boyce059 R. L. Boyce, Sherena Boyce & Kody Harrell060 Duwayne Burnside061 R. L. Boyce & Kody Harrell062 Duwayne Burnside063 Duwayne Burnside064 R. L. & Sherena Boyce065 R. L. & Sherena Boyce066 R. L. Boyce, Kody Harrell & Sherena Boyce067 Duwayne Burnside & R. L. Boyce068 Duwayne Burnside & R. L. Boyce069 R. L. & Sherena Boyce070 Duwayne Burnside & R. L. Boyce071 Duwayne Burnside, Kenny Brown & R. L. Boyce072 R. L. Boyce073 Duwayne Burnside & R. L. Boyce077 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce078 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce
Duwayne Burnside had played The Shelter on Van Buren in Oxford, Mississippi earlier in the fall, but I had not been able to attend, so when it was announced that he would be playing there again on New Years’ Eve, I was eager to be there. It would prove to be both my first, and sadly my last, visit to The Shelter.
The venue was a coffee bar and live music venue, which also served a very limited food menu, some desserts, and craft beer. The atmosphere was extremely laid back, with couches, benches, chairs and tables in a rather haphazard pattern near the stage. The night of Hill Country blues featured not only Duwayne Burnside but also Kenny Brown, and a few local Oxford musicians, including guitarist Kody Harrell. At first Duwayne’s drummer had not shown up, so he was playing a sort of “unplugged” acoustic set. After his drummer arrived, he picked up the pace and intensity level to an extent, and the moderate crowd in the seats loved every minute of it. Como bluesman R. L. Boyce then joined Duwayne on stage for a few songs, and some local musicians came up to sit end toward the show’s end. At 10 PM or so, Duwayne brought things to a halt, as he had another show at The Hut in Holly Springs starting at 11, and we all left in a happy frame of mind. Unfortunately, it would be the last time we got to visit The Shelter on Van Buren. A week into the new year, it abruptly closed for good.

Celebrating The Legacy of R. L. Burnside at Hernando’s Front Porch Jubilee

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

The Clifton Gin was a large building that loomed over the West End neighborhood of Hernando, Mississippi where many blues musicians lived and played their trade in nearby jukes. The Rev. Robert Wilkins, Gus Cannon and Jim Jackson all lived in the area for a time, and Mississippi Joe Callicott was from nearby Nesbit, Mississippi. Now each year, the city of Hernando commemorates that musical legacy with an event called the Front Porch Jubilee, held on the grounds of the historic gin, as part of Hernando’s larger Water Tower Festival. This year’s jubilee honored the legacy of the late R. L. Burnside, and members of the Burnside family were presented with a plaque. Performers included Jack Rowell and Triple Threat, Desoto County native Kenny Brown, who was mentored by both Joe Callicott and R. L. Burnside, Duwayne Burnside, Lightning Malcolm, rockabilly legend Travis Wammack, and R. L. Burnside’s grandson Cedric, performing with Trenton Ayers as the Cedric Burnside Project. In addition to the great music, there was a considerable amount of great food too, including some excellent pulled pork and the homemade ice cream from Senatobia-based Bliss. A warm afternoon turned to a chilly evening, but a stalwart crowd of about a hundred stayed to the end of Cedric’s last set. It was a great day of blues in Hernando.








Day 2 of the R. L. Burnside Memorial Jam

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

My girlfriend and I had planned on going to see Cameron Kimbrough, who we thought was playing in Helena, Arkansas, but it ultimately turned out that he was playing in Warren, Arkansas instead, which is a three-hour drive. There was no chance of making it there before he went on stage, so we had dinner at the Holiday Lodge on Sardis Lake at Harmontown and then headed to the Blues Shack for the second day of the R. L. Burnside Memorial Jam. Holly Springs bluesman Little Joe Ayers was on stage when we arrived, playing to a crowd that was somewhat larger than the one on Friday night. After Joe performed, then Duwayne Burnside and Kenny Brown got on stage and performed such Hill Country classics as “All Night Long” and “Meet Me in the City.” Although we were having a great time there, we ultimately cut it short because my girlfriend wanted to catch Cedric Burnside, who was playing at Proud Larry’s in Oxford, so we left out and headed down that way.



Honoring the Legacy of R. L. Burnside at the Blues Shack

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

Duwayne Burnside, son of the late R. L. Burnside, is one of the best guitar players in the country, and in September each year, he sponsors the R. L. Burnside Memorial Jam at the Blues Shack, which is out in the middle of nowhere off of Highway 310 and Old Oxford Road near Waterford, Mississippi. Don’t be expecting a big formal festival like the Hill Country Picnic. Instead, you pay your $10 entry fee at a gate on a gravel driveway and come to a small wooden stage in front of a mobile home. The pleasant smell of barbecue smoke from an oil drum drifts through the air, and a small crowd is mesmerized by such musicians as Duwayne Burnside, Kenny Brown, Garry Burnside and Little Joe Ayers, in a more intimate setting where the line between performers and fans is non-existent. Duwayne might come down off the stage for a break and sit at your picnic table, or he might be behind the food stand pouring beers or fixing food plates. With plenty of children running around and having fun, it feels more like being invited to a house party than a festival. And that is an experience not to be missed.

Blues In The Alley At A Crossroads?

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

Marshall County, Mississippi and its county seat of Holly Springs are ground zero when it comes to the subgenre known as Hill Country blues. After all, the style’s two greatest stars, Junior Kimbrough and R. L. Burnside were from the county, and largely pursued their music careers there for the better part of their lives. As such, there is potential for blues tourism in Holly Springs, and the powers that be there have been slowly attempting to capitalize on it, sponsoring a weekly summer event during the months of July and August on Thursday nights called Blues in the Alley. On previous years, this event has showcased a lot of local and regional talent, including R. L. Burnside’s sons Duwayne and Garry, and Junior Kimbrough’s sons David and Robert, as well as Little Joe Ayers, and other blues musicians steeped in the Hill Country style. A stage is set up on the courthouse square, and on average, several hundred people show up to dance, party and enjoy the music.
Unfortunately, this year was different. When the event kicked off on June 30, Potts Camp legend Kenny Brown was on stage, and he had invited his friend Duwayne Burnside to perform as well.A crowd of several hundred people turned out to enjoy the kickoff, which was capped by a fireworks display. A week or two later, Lightning Malcolm, also familiar to Hill Country fans was the featured artist. But sadly, that was as good as it would get this year. As the summer stretched on, it became apparent that the festival organizers did not intend to book Duwayne or Garry Burnside (Duwayne ultimately appeared at Foxfire), nor Cedric Burnside (who played at New Albany’s Park on the River on July 2), nor David or Robert Kimbrough (Robert played a Sunday evening at Foxfire later in the summer), nor Little Joe Ayers. In fact, as the festival booked unknown bands like the Around The Corner Band, and out-of-town groups like the Juke Joint Three, something even more disturbing became apparent. For the most part, this year’s Blues In The Alley was booking only white artists. In fact, by the time the festival ended on September 1 with Gerod Rayborn, as best I could determine, only two Black artists had been featured all summer, and one of them, Oxford’s Cassie Bonner, is a singer/songwriter and not a blues artist at all. Ultimately, the programming choices affected attendance, which was way down, and skewed the crowds that did show up racially, with far fewer Blacks choosing to attend the weekly event. And this was all the more noticeable, as Holly Springs and Marshall County have a large Black majority. Sadly, it seems there is no way this was coincidental. Local Marshall County artists that are world-famous were passed over in favor of unknown (but white) bands from somewhere else. Although I asked a number of my friends in Holly Springs if they had heard any reason for the drastic change in booking policy, no justification for the change was ever readily forthcoming.
Ultimately, if Holly Springs wants to capitalize on its blues legacy as Clarksdale has managed to do, it must choose to become far less race-conscious as a town. The organizers of Blues in the Alley must understand that the Kimbrough and Burnside names are known all over the world, and that these are the artists that need to be booked if the goal is to get people to visit Holly Springs from other states or other countries. There’s nothing wrong with booking highly-talented white blues artists with impeccable Hill Country credentials like Lightning Malcolm, Kenny Brown or Eric Deaton. But Holly Springs and Marshall County are predominantly-Black, and Blues in the Alley should offer something for the Black majority as well…particularly if public funds are being expended. Otherwise, there may eventually not be a Blues in the Alley at all.

Throwing Down at the Home Place Near Como, Mississippi

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

The Home Place Plantation was founded near Como in 1869, just a few years after the end of the Civil War. From then until now, it has belonged to members of the Bartlett family, and was until recently a traditional farm raising cattle as well as cotton, soybeans and similar crops. But the youngest generation of the family has converted the Home Place from a plantation to Home Place Pastures, an organic, sustainable pig farm raising high-quality pork that is sold in regional farmer’s markets. As such they are on the cutting edge of a number of popular movements, including the locavore movement that seeks to source food from areas close to where one lives. The new vision for the Home Place also includes special events, including a live blues experience called the Home Place Throw Down, which this year was held on August 20. Because of periodic rain, the organizers decided to move the stage across the road from where it had been the previous year to a roofed pavilion on the opposite side, and moving the stage was easy, because it was a yellow school bus with its front wall cut away so as to make a stage, and it actually still runs. Despite the risk of rain, more than a hundred people turned out to hear such artists as the Rev. John Wilkins, the Home Place Blues Band (which seemed to be an alter-ego for the Como-tions), the legendary R. L. Boyce and Kenny Brown. In between acts, Sharde Thomas led her Rising Star Fife and Drum Band through the crowd, with Como musician R. L. Boyce on one of the snare drums. With a rather eerie moonlight in the east, the hypnotic drumming gathered a crowd of dancers in the twilight, reaching back before the blues to something more fundamental. Besides the great music, there was plenty of beer, as well as barbecued pork (Home Place pork of course) that was some of the best I’ve ever eaten, and although I was told that the barbecue sauce was a vinegar-based Carolina-style sauce, I surprisingly loved it, and found it to be just sweet enough for me to enjoy. After Kenny Brown’s final rousing set, Sharde Thomas and her drummers were back to lead the crowd out to the front gate to close out the evening’s festivities. It was a truly amazing blues experience in a perfect setting with great food, in a community known for its legacy of blues, Black gospel, and fife and drum music.









Celebrating Hill Country Blues at Foxfire Ranch

047 Foxfire049 Welcome To Foxfire Ranch050 The Blues Pavilion at Foxfire054 Heavy Suga and the Sweet Tones055 Sweet Tones Drummer058 Foxfire Blues Festival062 Leo Bud Welch071 Little Joe Ayers074 Bill Howl-N-Madd Perry077 Duwayne Burnside079 Bill Howl-N-Madd Perry082 Foxfire Blues Fest084 Sherena Boyce089 JJ093 Duwayne Burnside098 Duwayne Burnside and Kenny Brown101 Duwayne Burnside106 Sherena Boyce108 Sherena Boyce111 Kenny Brown114 Duwayne Burnside118 JJ117 JJ121 Foxfire Blues Fest122 Foxfire Blues Fest126 Kingfish Ingram128 Foxfire Blues Fest131 Lightning Malcolm
Fans of the unique Mississippi style of blues known as Hill Country blues are of course very familiar with Marshall County, as it was the home of both Junior Kimbrough and R. L. Burnside, arguably the two most important Hill Country bluesmen. And they are probably also familiar with the Foxfire Ranch at Waterford in Marshall County, where a superb summer schedule of live blues occurs nearly every Sunday at 5 PM, under a shelter known as the Hill Country Pavilion. But this year, the Hollowell family, which owns the ranch, decided to sponsor an all-day concert of blues, and somewhat surprisingly, chose to do it in March, which is slightly earlier than the start-up of the festival season, which generally occurs in April.
Although the weather can be chilly and unpredictable in March, this year’s inaugural Foxfire Blues Festival was warm and pleasant, with plenty of sunshine. A large portable stage had been set up in the valley at the back of the large hill on which the pavilion stands, and a moderate crowd sat on blankets on the hillside, enjoying performances by Little Joe Ayers, Bill “Howl-N-Madd” Perry, Heavy Suga and the Sweet Tones, The Duwayne Burnside Band, Kenny Brown, Christone “Kingfish” Ingram and Lightning Malcolm. For a first-time festival, the event was fairly well-attended, it rolled smoothly, and the crowd enjoyed a beautiful day of great music.











Day 2 of the Otha Turner Picnic at Gravel Springs

1790 Otha Turner Picnic1787 Along the Road1786 Along the Road1784 The Other Festival1782 Kenny Brown1781 Kenny Brown1780 The Como-Tions1778 Sharde Thomas1776 Full Moon1774 Stud & Lightning1772 David Evans1170 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band095 Lightning Malcolm094 Lightning Malcolm093 Lightning Malcolm092 Stud091 Lightning Malcolm090 Lightning Malcolm089 Lightning Malcolm088 Otha Turner Picnic087 Otha Turner Picnic086 Otha Turner Picnic085 Lightning Malcolm084 Lightning Malcolm083 Along the Road082 Along the Road081 Sharde Thomas080 Sharde Thomas079 Sharde Thomas078 Otha Turner Picnic077 The Other Festival075 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band074 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band073 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band072 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band071 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band070 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band069 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band068 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band067 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band066 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band065 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band064 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band063 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band062 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band061 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band060 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band059 Sharde Thomas058 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band057 Rising Star Fife and Drum Band056 Otha Turner Picnic055 Lightning Malcolm & Kenny Brown054 Otha Turner Picnic053 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm051 Sherena and Malcolm050 Otha Turner Picnic049 Kenny Brown048 Stud047 Kenny Brown046 Kenny Brown045 Kenny Brown044 Kenny Brown043 Kenny Brown041 Otha Turner Picnic040 The Como-Tions038 The Como-Tions037 The Como-Tions036 The Como-Tions035 The Como-Tions034 The Como-Tions033 The Como-Tions032 The Como-Tions031 The Como-Tions030 The Como-Tions029 The Como-Tions028 The Como-Tions027 The Como-Tions025 The Como-Tions024 The Como-Tions020 Stud & Lightning019 Lightning Malcolm018 Stud017 Stud016 Stud015 Stud014 Dr. David Evans013 Otha Turner Picnic012 Dr. David Evans011 Dr. David Evans009 Dr. David Evans008 Dr. David Evans007 Dr. David Evans006 Otha Turner Picnic005 Otha Turner Picnic004 Otha Turner Picnic003 Otha Turner Picnic
The second day of the annual Otha Turner Picnic in Gravel Springs near Senatobia always falls on a Saturday, and brings out a larger crowd. This year, there were performances by Dr. David Evans, the eminent musicologist from the University of Memphis, a new blues-rock band called the Como-Tions from Como, Mississippi, and Lightning Malcolm, as well as the periodic parades around the grounds with Sharde Thomas and the Rising Star Fife and Drum Band. On this Saturday night, the bass drum beat seemed more insistent and the dancers more exuberant and enthusiastic as the night progressed. In addition, there was a massive block party outside the gates along O. B. McClinton Road as literally hundreds of young people lined both sides of the highway, just hanging out. There was also supposed to be some sort of after-event at L.P.’s field on Hunters Chapel Road, but when I drove past there, I only saw a few cars, so I kept on rolling.










Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough and Garry Burnside Live at Holly Springs

010 Cu-Man's011 Holly Springs012 Marshall County Courthouse013 Holly Springs014 Holly Springs015 Duwayne Burnside and Son016 Duwayne Burnside and Son017 Cameron Kimbrough, Kenny Brown & Garry Burnside018 Marshall County Courthouse019 Duwayne Burnside and Friend020 North Center Street021 North Center Street022 Blues in the Alley023 Duwayne Burnside and Family024 Oxford All-Stars Band025 Blues in the Alley026 Blues in the Alley027 Holly Springs Sunset028 Blues in the Alley029 Oxford All-Stars030 Blues in the Alley031 Blues in the Alley032 North Center Street033 Blues in the Alley034 Oxford All-Stars035 Oxford All-Stars036 Oxford All-Stars037 Blues in the Alley038 Blues in the Alley039 Blues in the Alley040 Oxford All-Stars041 Oxford All-Stars042 Blues in the Alley043 Oxford All-Stars044 Blues in the Alley046 Oxford All-Stars047 Oxford All-Stars048 Oxford All-Stars049 Oxford All-Stars050 Oxford All-Stars051 Oxford All-Stars052 Holly Springs Sunset #2053 Jukin'054 Blues in the Alley055 Blues in the Alley056 Kenny Brown & Cameron Kimbrough057 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough & Garry Burnside058 Cameron Kimbrough059 Kenny Brown061 Kenny Brown062 Cameron Kimbrough & Garry Burnside063 Kenny Brown067 Blues in the Alley068 Kenny Brown069 Kenny Brown & Garry Burnside070 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough & Garry Burnside071 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough & Garry Burnside072 Blues in the Alley073 Blues in the Alley074 Kenny Brown Band075 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough & Garry Burnside076 Cameron Kimbrough & Garry Burnside077 Kenny Brown Band078 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough & Garry Burnside079 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough & Garry Burnside080 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough & Duwayne Burnside081 Kenny Brown & Duwyane & Garry Burnside085 Kenny Brown & Duwayne Burnside086 Kenny Brown & Duwayne Burnside087 Kenny Brown, Duwayne Burnside, Kent Kimbrough & Garry Burnside088 Cameron Kimbrough, Kent Kimbrough & Garry Burnside089 Kenny Brown & Duwayne Burnside090 Kenny Brown & Duwayne Burnside091 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough, Kent Kimbrough & Garry Burnside092 Blues in the Alley093 Blues in the Alley094 Blues in the Alley095 Blues in the Alley1701 Oxford All-Stars1703 Oxford All-Stars1705 Oxford All-Stars1707 Kenny Brown1708 Kenny Brown & Duwayne Burnside1709 Kenny Brown & Duwayne Burnside
Going the Old Hudsonville Road from Hudsonville to Holly Springs proved to be a mistake, because more than half the distance between the two communities was gravel, but the road did take me into a neighborhood of Holly Springs that I had never seen before, an area to the east of the Rust College campus where there were several churches, a Roman Catholic school and a juke joint called Cu-Man’s. But for some reason, the crowd on the square on this particular Thursday was far less than it had been the last time I went a couple of weeks before. Through an error, the people in charge of the weekly event had booked two different bands for the same time slot, so the Oxford All-Stars opened up the evening, playing a lot of Motown and Memphis classics, and a couple of blues, and then they were followed by Hill Country veteran Kenny Brown, with Cameron Kimbrough (son of Kinney Kimbrough and grandson of Junior) on drums, and Garry Burnside ( son of R. L.) on bass. After a few songs, they were joined on stage by Garry’s brother Duwayne Burnside, who did several of the Hill Country classics with the band. As the temperatures cooled off, the crowd around the square grew larger, and the final song featured Cameron’s dad Kent “Kinney” Kimbrough on drums.