Fine Dining Comes to Marshall County at Marshall Steakhouse


Holly Springs and Marshall County, Mississippi are a frequent destination for blues tourism. Two of Mississippi’s greatest blues families, the Burnsides and the Kimbroughs are from the county, and Foxfire Ranch, the Blues in the Alley concert series, and the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic attract blues fans, particularly during the summer months. But up until recently, tourists wanting an upscale dinner had to make their way to Oxford or to the Memphis area. That changed in July with the opening of Marshall Steakhouse on Highway 178 between Red Banks and Holly Springs.
Marshall Steakhouse is as much a destination as a restaurant, featuring a truly-massive park-like setting that includes an outside stage and plenty of seating. On the night of my visit, a bluegrass group was playing on the stage to a small crowd.
The restaurant, which had only been open a week, was incredibly crowded, with probably around fifty or more people waiting for seating. But, to my surprise, I suppose because I was only one person, I was seated immediately. It needs to be noted however that there are no small, intimate tables for two, and that parties of one or two are usually seated at the opposite end of a long table from other guests. Although Marshall Steakhouse is not cheap, they have some very reasonably-priced entrees, including two cuts of sirloin. I ordered the small sirloin, and was quite impressed with its flavor. Sirloin steaks can be tough, but this one was extremely tender, and easy to cut. The yeast bread was hot and delicious, and the baked potato was very good as well. I was also impressed by the fact that the price of my steak included all the accompaniments as well, something that is definitely not the case at a lot of steakhouses these days. I have to mention too that Marshall Steakhouse has a challenge- a 72-ounce steak with salad and baked potato that is free if a person can finish ALL of it within an hour. If not finished within an hour, it costs $89! I have not heard whether anyone has taken the challenge, and whether anyone has actually won it. As for the service, it was friendly, but fairly erratic, with lots of people being offered other people’s orders, but that is not necessarily surprising one week in. Corrections were made promptly, and everybody made happy. One thing to note, though- the Marshall Steakhouse is not a place to be caught up in your cellphone. Made entirely out of metal, the building is a true deadzone inside, and most phones get no signal. There is currently no public wi-fi. But there is plenty of decor, and large-screen televisions hanging from the walls. Besides, who stays buried in their phone at dinner anyway?

Marshall Steakhouse
2379 Highway 178 W
Holly Springs, MS 38635
(662) 252-2424
https://www.facebook.com/MarshallSteakhouse/
https://twitter.com/marshallsteaks?lang=en

A Reunion of Hill Country Greats at Foxfire Blues Festival


After a debut festival last year in March, this year the Foxfire Blues Festival moved to April, and one of the highlights of this year’s event was the reunion of Lightnin Malcolm and Cedric Burnside, two Hill Country blues musicians that began their careers together, but ended up going their separate ways, Cedric into the highly successful Cedric Burnside Project with Trenton Ayers, son of the Hill Country guitarist Little Joe Ayers. Both musicians were in rare form, and they seemed to enjoy the collaboration, each including songs from their old career together, as well as songs from their solo careers since. As both men play guitar and drums, it was easy for them to switch instruments for each other, and the results were magical. The Foxfire Blues Festival kicks off the blues season at Foxfire Ranch, which is located on Old Oxford Road just outside the small village of Waterford, Mississippi in Marshall County on Highway 7. From April until probably September, live blues will be held at the Hill Country Blues Pavilion on Sundays from 5-10 PM. Admission is usually $10, and worth every penny of it.




Duwayne Burnside Live at Foxfire Ranch

Duwayne Burnside Live at Foxfire Ranch / Google Photos

To be one of the greatest living blues guitarists, Duwayne Burnside doesn’t get booked nearly often enough, so any opportunity to see him play live should be taken advantage of. And there are few venues more conducive to the blues than Bill Hollowell’s Foxfire Ranch at Waterford, Mississippi, where, every Sunday during the warm weather months, the best blues artists from the Hill Country perform in a homey, intimate setting. There’s no backstage area, no green rooms or dressing rooms, no fence in front of the stage. Performers and their fans are free to interact, and dancers have plenty of room to jook to the music.
Duwayne is perfectly at home in this kind of setting. His friends and family often come with him, and he banters with the crowd between songs as if he’s been knowing them all his life. He is equally at home with the repertoires of his father R. L. Burnside, and the other great legend of Hill Country blues, Junior Kimbrough, and when he launches into any blues tune, his face breaks into a smile with the sheer joy of invention and creation. On the more rocking tunes, such as “See My Jumper Hanging Out On The Line”, the open space in front of the stage fills up quickly with dancers, and Duwayne calls a few guest singers and musicians to the stage. But the night belongs to him, and when he begins to give out from fatigue, it is nearly 10 PM. The crowd begins to wander away, just as the rainstorms break out in earnest.

R. L. Boyce & Friends at Foxfire Ranch

R. L. Boyce, Cameron Kimbrough, Joyce Jones Live at Foxfire Ranch / Google Photos

During the summer, Hill Country blues fans flock every Sunday evening to Foxfire Ranch near Waterford, Mississippi for weekly performances of the genre’s best musicians under the Blues Pavilion, and Sunday, August 7 was a truly special occasion featuring one of the last living legends of the Hill Country, R. L. Boyce from Como. Boyce was assisted by a number of guest musicians, including one of Junior Kimbrough’s grandsons, Cameron Kimbrough on drums and vocals, J. J. Wilburn on drums (who has played with Robert Kimbrough and Duwayne Burnside), G-Cutter on guitar, and Monsieur Jeffrey Evans of ’68 Comeback on guitar. Cameron Kimbrough’s mother Joyce Jones sang a rousing version of her song “Poor Black Man”, and Jeffrey Evans and drummer Ross Johnson performed several songs from their repertoire, including “The Roadrunner” and Jim Reeve’s “He’ll Have To Go” while R. L. Boyce took a break. Finally, before the end of the night, Robert Kimbrough came on stage to perform his song “The Girl Is Gone”. It was a memorable night of classic Hill Country blues and rock and roll.









Celebrating Hill Country Blues at Foxfire Ranch

047 Foxfire049 Welcome To Foxfire Ranch050 The Blues Pavilion at Foxfire054 Heavy Suga and the Sweet Tones055 Sweet Tones Drummer058 Foxfire Blues Festival062 Leo Bud Welch071 Little Joe Ayers074 Bill Howl-N-Madd Perry077 Duwayne Burnside079 Bill Howl-N-Madd Perry082 Foxfire Blues Fest084 Sherena Boyce089 JJ093 Duwayne Burnside098 Duwayne Burnside and Kenny Brown101 Duwayne Burnside106 Sherena Boyce108 Sherena Boyce111 Kenny Brown114 Duwayne Burnside118 JJ117 JJ121 Foxfire Blues Fest122 Foxfire Blues Fest126 Kingfish Ingram128 Foxfire Blues Fest131 Lightning Malcolm
Fans of the unique Mississippi style of blues known as Hill Country blues are of course very familiar with Marshall County, as it was the home of both Junior Kimbrough and R. L. Burnside, arguably the two most important Hill Country bluesmen. And they are probably also familiar with the Foxfire Ranch at Waterford in Marshall County, where a superb summer schedule of live blues occurs nearly every Sunday at 5 PM, under a shelter known as the Hill Country Pavilion. But this year, the Hollowell family, which owns the ranch, decided to sponsor an all-day concert of blues, and somewhat surprisingly, chose to do it in March, which is slightly earlier than the start-up of the festival season, which generally occurs in April.
Although the weather can be chilly and unpredictable in March, this year’s inaugural Foxfire Blues Festival was warm and pleasant, with plenty of sunshine. A large portable stage had been set up in the valley at the back of the large hill on which the pavilion stands, and a moderate crowd sat on blankets on the hillside, enjoying performances by Little Joe Ayers, Bill “Howl-N-Madd” Perry, Heavy Suga and the Sweet Tones, The Duwayne Burnside Band, Kenny Brown, Christone “Kingfish” Ingram and Lightning Malcolm. For a first-time festival, the event was fairly well-attended, it rolled smoothly, and the crowd enjoyed a beautiful day of great music.











Enjoying the Hill Country Blues Legacy at Junior’s Juke Joint #2 in Holly Springs

038 Robert Kimbrough Band039 Junior's Juke Joint #2040 Junior's Juke Joint #2041 Junior's Juke Joint #2042 Junior's Juke Joint #2043 The Kimbroughs044 Junior's Juke Joint #2
I never had a chance to visit Junior Kimbrough’s legendary juke in Chulahoma, but his son David’s juke in Holly Springs is the place to check out live Hill Country blues every Sunday at 6 PM, with a band consisting of David Kimbrough and Robert Kimbrough on guitars and Kinney Kimbrough on drums. With nearby Foxfire Ranch in Waterford offering blues every Sunday at 5 PM, Sunday is definitely blues day in Marshall County. Junior’s Juke Joint #2 is located just north of the Rust College campus on Highway 7 in Holly Springs. Admission is $10.

Joyce Jones, Kenny Brown, R. B. Stone and Destination Up at Foxfire Ranch

001 Joyce Jones & Friends002 Joyce Jones & Friends003 Hill Country Blues Pavilion004 Destination Up005 Destination Up006 Destination Up007 Destination Up008 Destination Up009 Destination UP010 Foxfire Ranch011 Hill Country Blues Pavilion012 Kenny Brown013 Joyce Jones & Friends014 R B Stone015 Kenny Brown016 Joyce Jones & Cameron Kimbrough017 Kenny Brown, Cameron Kimbrough & R. B. Stone018 Dancing019 R. B. Stone020 R. B. Stone & Joyce Jones021 Joyce Jones & Friends022 Kenny Brown & Joyce Jones023 Joyce Jones & Friends024 Kenny Brown, Joyce Jones & Cameron Kimbrough025 Joyce Jones026 Sherena Boyce027 Shaking The Tambourine028 Kenny Brown & Joyce Jones029 Joyce Jones030 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm031 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm032 Cameron Kimbrough033 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm034 Lightning Malcolm & Cameron Kimbrough035 Testing The Mic036 Kenny Brown & Lightning Malcolm037 Kenny Brown, Lightning Malcolm & Cameron Kimbrough
On Mothers’ Day afternoon, I saw that Joyce Jones, whom I had seen at Sherena Boyce’s party in Como a month ago, would be performing at Foxfire Ranch in Waterford, Mississippi. The weather was warm and sunny, so I decided to drive down, but I got there about an hour after the gate opened. Joyce performed one song after I arrived, but then turned over the stage to a comedian, an evangelist, a Southern Soul artist with a song called “Pour It In A Cup”, and then a Christian rock band called Destination Up. The latter act was interesting, as the drummer was one of Joyce’s cousins, and although I’m not always a big fan of rock, they were really good musicians and I loved the uplifting message of their songs. Then Kenny Brown came back on stage, with Joyce Jones and a guest artist from Nashville named R. B. Stone and Cameron Kimbrough on drums. They did several traditional Hill Country blues songs, including the standard “Rolling & Tumbling” and “Old Black Man”, Joyce Jones’ variant of the standard “Coal Black Mattie” or “Old Black Mattie”. Then Lightning Malcolm came up to feature on a song as well. Although it wasn’t exactly what I expected, it ended up being a decent night of music under a full moon and starry sky.

Keep up with Joyce Jones here:
https://www.facebook.com/joyce.jones.5249349

Keep up with Destination Up here:
https://www.facebook.com/Destin8ionUp

Keep up with Foxfire Ranch here:
http://www.foxfireranch.com
https://www.facebook.com/foxfireranch2008



An All-Star Gala of Hill Country Blues at Leo Bud Welch’s Album Release Party

001 Jason Carter002 Jason Carter003 Jason Carter004 Jason Carter005 Jason Carter006 Jason Carter007 Leo Bud Welch & Duwayne Burnside008 Leo Bud Welch, Duwayne Burnside & Jimbo Mathus009 Leo Bud Welch, Duwayne Burnside & Jimbo Mathus010 Leo Bud Welch, Duwayne Burnside, Duwayne Jr & Jimbo Mathus011 Jason Carter012 Jason Carter013 Jason Carter014 Jason Carter015 Robert Bilbo Walker Limo016 Robert Bilbo Walker Limo017 Robert Bilbo Walker Limo018 Robert Bilbo Walker Limo019 Hill Country Blues Pavilion020 Hill Country Blues Pavilion021 Welcome to Foxfire Ranch022 Duwayne & Gary Burnside023 Duwayne & Gary Burnside024 Duwayne & Gary Burnside025 Hill Country Blues Pavilion026 Foxfire027 Cedric Burnside028 Cedric Burnside029 Cedric Burnside030 Duwayne Jr031 Passing The Tradition On032 Cedric Burnside Project033 Trenton Ayers034 Cedric Burnside035 Cedric Burnside Project036 Cedric Burnside037 Duwayne Jr038 Trenton Ayers039 Cedric Burnside040 Cedric Burnside Project041 Cedric Burnside Project042 Cedric Burnside Project043 Trenton Ayers044 Cedric Burnside Project045 Hill Country Blues Pavilion046 Duwayne Burnside & Son047 Leo Bud Welch On The Road048 Cedric Burnside Project049 Foxfire Ranch050 Hill Country Pavilion051 Dancing052 Cedric Burnside Project053 Dancing054 Dancing055 Jimbo Mathus056 Jimbo Mathus057 Jimbo Mathus058 Jimbo Mathus059 Jimbo Mathus060 Jimbo Mathus061 Jimbo Mathus062 Jimbo Mathus063 Jimbo Mathus064 Jimbo Mathus065 Jimbo Mathus066 Jimbo Mathus067 Jimbo Mathus068 Jimbo Mathus069 Robert Bilbo Walker070 Robert Bilbo Walker071 Robert Bilbo Walker072 Robert Bilbo Walker073 Robert Bilbo Walker074 Robert Bilbo Walker075 Robert Bilbo Walker076 Robert Bilbo Walker077 Robert Bilbo Walker078 Robert Bilbo Walker079 Dancing080 Sherena081 Robert Bilbo Walker082 Leo Bud Welch083 Leo Bud Welch084 Leo Bud Welch085 Leo Bud Welch086 Leo Bud Welch087 Leo Bud Welch088 Leo Bud Welch089 Leo Bud Welch090 Leo Bud Welch091 Leo Bud Welch092 Sherena093 Dancing094 Leo Bud Welch
Perhaps Easter doesn’t bring thoughts of blues to many people, but this Easter evening was the occasion for an amazing event at Foxfire Ranch celebrating the release of a new album by 84-year-old bluesman Leo “Bud” Welch. Welch’s story is amazing, for he is an authentic traditional bluesman who remained undiscovered until 2013 at the age of 82, when he began recording his first record. He signed with Fat Possum’s Big Legal Mess subsidiary the same year, and released his debut album Sabougla Voices, which was a gospel record. (“Sabougla” is a hamlet in Calhoun County, Mississippi where Welch is from). Gospel is Leo’s preferred music, but his young audiences love to hear him play blues, and he does so on his sophomore album, which is aptly entitled I Don’t Prefer No Blues. But to celebrate its release, rather than a typical release party, a full evening of live Hill Country blues was scheduled at the Hill Country Pavilion at Foxfire near Waterford, Mississippi. Although the sun was out, the day was chilly, but a decent crowd showed up at 5 PM for the opening act, Jason Carter, who performed acoustically with another guitar player. Right behind him came Cedric Burnside and Trenton Ayres, collectively known as the Cedric Burnside Project, who got things crunk with the heavy, rock-inflected brand of blues they play, including one of Cedric’s trademark extended drum solos. Several members of the legendary Burnside family were in the audience, including Duwayne and Garry Burnside. The next act up was something a little different. Jimbo Mathus and the Tri-State Coalition are also on the Fat Possum label, and are more of a strange but winsome amalgam of indie rock, traditional country, blues and funk, which Jimbo whimsically calls “catfish music”. Although he maintains a different sound than Hill Country blues, the influence of blues can be heard through much of his work. Robert “Bilbo” Walker is 76 years old nowadays, and is a former Mississippi bluesman who currently lives in California. Although he is originally from Mississippi, his music has considerable Louisiana and swamp influences, which came to the forefront in his reading of the classic blues/soul song “Staggerlee”. Finally, at the end of the night, Leo “Bud” Welch came up with his three-piece band and performed a collection of songs from the new album, which he had available for sale there at the pavilion. When things finally came to an end around 10 PM, there was still a decent crowd.













Keep Up With Jason Carter & The Healers:
https://www.facebook.com/jasoncarterandthehealers/info?tab=page_info

Keep Up With Cedric Burnside:
http://cedricburnside.com
https://www.facebook.com/cedric.burnside.5

Keep up with Jimbo Mathus:
http://jimbomathus.com
https://www.facebook.com/jimbomathus
https://www.youtube.com/user/jimbomathusvideo

https://myspace.com/jimbomathus

Keep up with Robert “Bilbo” Walker:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Robert-Bilbo-Walker/144881378903373

Keep up with Leo “Bud” Welch:
http://www.leobudwelch.com
https://www.facebook.com/leobud.welch

Keep up with Foxfire Ranch:
http://www.foxfireranch.com
https://www.facebook.com/foxfireranch2008

Keep up with Fat Possum Records & Big Legal Mess Music:

Home


https://www.facebook.com/FatPossumRecords



https://fatpossumrecords.bandcamp.com
http://biglegalmessrecords.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Big-Legal-Mess-Records/134672929932373

Duwayne Burnside Live at Foxfire Ranch, Waterford MS, 7/21/13


On Sunday, July 21st, I was driving back from Atlanta to Memphis, and while I stopped at O’Henry’s Coffee in Homewood, Alabama for a latte, I saw on my phone that blues great Duwayne Burnside would be playing at Foxfire Ranch,a large outdoor venue at Waterford, Mississippi in Marshall County. So I called my homeboy Mike Suggs, who lives in Marshall County and asked him if he wanted to meet me there and he said he would. Actually, the Foxfire Ranch has blues every Sunday night during the summer months, and I was surprised at the extent of the crowd. And although this was very much Duwayne’s show, everyone who is anyone in Hill County blues just about showed up, including Shannon McNally, Kenny and Sarah Brown (organizers of the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic), Little Joe Ayers and Kinny Kimbrough. It was a night of great music and great fun.