Rain Couldn’t Dampen The Enthusiasm At Juke Joint Festival


Each year, Clarksdale becomes the center of attention in the blues world, as fans come from all over the world for the Juke Joint Festival. Although the official festival is only one day, events surrounding it now stretch over four days, and hotels are sold out for more than 75 miles in any direction. Unfortunately, this year, for the first time in memory, the festival was adversely affected by wet weather, showers that continued for much of the morning and early afternoon. Nevertheless, there were still significant crowds at many of the stages, and by the afternoon, the showers had begun to exit the area. In addition to the vendors of artwork, cigar-box guitars, books and more, attendees enjoyed performances by Lightnin Malcolm, the Cedric Burnside Project, Carlos Elliot, the Andre Otha Evans Fife and Drum Band, Garry Burnside, Duwayne Burnside, R. L. Boyce and many other performers from the Hill Country, the Delta, South America, Europe and other parts of the United States. This year also saw a larger number of stages and participating venues. One unfortunate trend this year however was the tendency of local restaurants to offer special, highly-limited menus for guests because of the Juke Joint Festival. We found that as a result, we often could not order what we wanted, and had to settle for things like burgers. I suppose the goal was to make things easier on the kitchen staff, but it ended up making things harder or at least less pleasant for the attendees. Still, it was a day of good music and good fun.





Celebrating The Legacy of R. L. Burnside at Hernando’s Front Porch Jubilee

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

The Clifton Gin was a large building that loomed over the West End neighborhood of Hernando, Mississippi where many blues musicians lived and played their trade in nearby jukes. The Rev. Robert Wilkins, Gus Cannon and Jim Jackson all lived in the area for a time, and Mississippi Joe Callicott was from nearby Nesbit, Mississippi. Now each year, the city of Hernando commemorates that musical legacy with an event called the Front Porch Jubilee, held on the grounds of the historic gin, as part of Hernando’s larger Water Tower Festival. This year’s jubilee honored the legacy of the late R. L. Burnside, and members of the Burnside family were presented with a plaque. Performers included Jack Rowell and Triple Threat, Desoto County native Kenny Brown, who was mentored by both Joe Callicott and R. L. Burnside, Duwayne Burnside, Lightning Malcolm, rockabilly legend Travis Wammack, and R. L. Burnside’s grandson Cedric, performing with Trenton Ayers as the Cedric Burnside Project. In addition to the great music, there was a considerable amount of great food too, including some excellent pulled pork and the homemade ice cream from Senatobia-based Bliss. A warm afternoon turned to a chilly evening, but a stalwart crowd of about a hundred stayed to the end of Cedric’s last set. It was a great day of blues in Hernando.








Cedric Burnside Live at Proud Larry’s On Oxford’s Biggest Day

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

Oxford was absolute pandemonium. The Crimson Tide of Alabama had come to town to play Ole Miss, and the result was the largest football crowd ever recorded in the history of Oxford as a town. Streets were gridlocked, and in the area around the courthouse square, streets were closed altogether. Parking was practically non-existent. So when my girlfriend said she wanted to go hear Cedric Burnside at Proud Larry’s, I envisioned a nightmare of no parking, and drunken, rowdy crowds that wouldn’t let us anywhere near the stage. Fortunately, I was wrong on both counts. We managed to find a parking place up on the hill by the Parks and Recreation office, and while Proud Larry’s was indeed crowded, it was not outrageously so, and many of those there were friends and relatives of Cedric Burnside. As for Cedric and his sidekick Trenton Ayers, they seemed to feed off the crowd’s energy, performing two rousing sets of Hill Country standards and originals before the closing hour of 12:30 AM. It was well worth the effort.

Cadillac Funk and Cedric Burnside At The Levitt AMP Summer Music Series in New Albany

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

The Levitt Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting live music opportunities in America, especially outdoor performances. Well-known to Memphians as the organization that helped save the Overton Park Shell, the foundation runs shells and other outdoor stages in a number of American cities, and sets up summer concert series in many more. This year, the Levitt Foundation announced a Summer Music Series in New Albany, Mississippi, taking advantage of the city’s recently renovated Park Along The River (the river in question being the Tallahatchie). On July 2, the series brought the Hill Country blues to New Albany with performances by Oxford-based Cadillac Funk, and then the Cedric Burnside Project, featuring Trenton Ayers (son of Little Joe Ayers) on guitar. A fairly large crowd showed up for the two-hours-worth of funk and blues, with dancers filling up the space in front of the stage. As is his custom, Cedric started his set out with several acoustic guitar songs before moving to the drums and inviting Trenton Ayers to join him. In its more hardcore, electric form, the Cedric Burnside Project performs a large repertoire, from originals that feature a Hill Country edge, to many of the songs made famous by Junior Kimbrough and Cedric’s grandfather, the late R. L. Burnside, such as “Firemen Ring The Bell” and “Goin’ Down South.” All too soon, the show was over, and the crowd was left asking for more.


An All-Star Gala of Hill Country Blues at Leo Bud Welch’s Album Release Party

001 Jason Carter002 Jason Carter003 Jason Carter004 Jason Carter005 Jason Carter006 Jason Carter007 Leo Bud Welch & Duwayne Burnside008 Leo Bud Welch, Duwayne Burnside & Jimbo Mathus009 Leo Bud Welch, Duwayne Burnside & Jimbo Mathus010 Leo Bud Welch, Duwayne Burnside, Duwayne Jr & Jimbo Mathus011 Jason Carter012 Jason Carter013 Jason Carter014 Jason Carter015 Robert Bilbo Walker Limo016 Robert Bilbo Walker Limo017 Robert Bilbo Walker Limo018 Robert Bilbo Walker Limo019 Hill Country Blues Pavilion020 Hill Country Blues Pavilion021 Welcome to Foxfire Ranch022 Duwayne & Gary Burnside023 Duwayne & Gary Burnside024 Duwayne & Gary Burnside025 Hill Country Blues Pavilion026 Foxfire027 Cedric Burnside028 Cedric Burnside029 Cedric Burnside030 Duwayne Jr031 Passing The Tradition On032 Cedric Burnside Project033 Trenton Ayers034 Cedric Burnside035 Cedric Burnside Project036 Cedric Burnside037 Duwayne Jr038 Trenton Ayers039 Cedric Burnside040 Cedric Burnside Project041 Cedric Burnside Project042 Cedric Burnside Project043 Trenton Ayers044 Cedric Burnside Project045 Hill Country Blues Pavilion046 Duwayne Burnside & Son047 Leo Bud Welch On The Road048 Cedric Burnside Project049 Foxfire Ranch050 Hill Country Pavilion051 Dancing052 Cedric Burnside Project053 Dancing054 Dancing055 Jimbo Mathus056 Jimbo Mathus057 Jimbo Mathus058 Jimbo Mathus059 Jimbo Mathus060 Jimbo Mathus061 Jimbo Mathus062 Jimbo Mathus063 Jimbo Mathus064 Jimbo Mathus065 Jimbo Mathus066 Jimbo Mathus067 Jimbo Mathus068 Jimbo Mathus069 Robert Bilbo Walker070 Robert Bilbo Walker071 Robert Bilbo Walker072 Robert Bilbo Walker073 Robert Bilbo Walker074 Robert Bilbo Walker075 Robert Bilbo Walker076 Robert Bilbo Walker077 Robert Bilbo Walker078 Robert Bilbo Walker079 Dancing080 Sherena081 Robert Bilbo Walker082 Leo Bud Welch083 Leo Bud Welch084 Leo Bud Welch085 Leo Bud Welch086 Leo Bud Welch087 Leo Bud Welch088 Leo Bud Welch089 Leo Bud Welch090 Leo Bud Welch091 Leo Bud Welch092 Sherena093 Dancing094 Leo Bud Welch
Perhaps Easter doesn’t bring thoughts of blues to many people, but this Easter evening was the occasion for an amazing event at Foxfire Ranch celebrating the release of a new album by 84-year-old bluesman Leo “Bud” Welch. Welch’s story is amazing, for he is an authentic traditional bluesman who remained undiscovered until 2013 at the age of 82, when he began recording his first record. He signed with Fat Possum’s Big Legal Mess subsidiary the same year, and released his debut album Sabougla Voices, which was a gospel record. (“Sabougla” is a hamlet in Calhoun County, Mississippi where Welch is from). Gospel is Leo’s preferred music, but his young audiences love to hear him play blues, and he does so on his sophomore album, which is aptly entitled I Don’t Prefer No Blues. But to celebrate its release, rather than a typical release party, a full evening of live Hill Country blues was scheduled at the Hill Country Pavilion at Foxfire near Waterford, Mississippi. Although the sun was out, the day was chilly, but a decent crowd showed up at 5 PM for the opening act, Jason Carter, who performed acoustically with another guitar player. Right behind him came Cedric Burnside and Trenton Ayres, collectively known as the Cedric Burnside Project, who got things crunk with the heavy, rock-inflected brand of blues they play, including one of Cedric’s trademark extended drum solos. Several members of the legendary Burnside family were in the audience, including Duwayne and Garry Burnside. The next act up was something a little different. Jimbo Mathus and the Tri-State Coalition are also on the Fat Possum label, and are more of a strange but winsome amalgam of indie rock, traditional country, blues and funk, which Jimbo whimsically calls “catfish music”. Although he maintains a different sound than Hill Country blues, the influence of blues can be heard through much of his work. Robert “Bilbo” Walker is 76 years old nowadays, and is a former Mississippi bluesman who currently lives in California. Although he is originally from Mississippi, his music has considerable Louisiana and swamp influences, which came to the forefront in his reading of the classic blues/soul song “Staggerlee”. Finally, at the end of the night, Leo “Bud” Welch came up with his three-piece band and performed a collection of songs from the new album, which he had available for sale there at the pavilion. When things finally came to an end around 10 PM, there was still a decent crowd.













Keep Up With Jason Carter & The Healers:
https://www.facebook.com/jasoncarterandthehealers/info?tab=page_info

Keep Up With Cedric Burnside:
http://cedricburnside.com
https://www.facebook.com/cedric.burnside.5

Keep up with Jimbo Mathus:
http://jimbomathus.com
https://www.facebook.com/jimbomathus
https://www.youtube.com/user/jimbomathusvideo

https://myspace.com/jimbomathus

Keep up with Robert “Bilbo” Walker:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Robert-Bilbo-Walker/144881378903373

Keep up with Leo “Bud” Welch:
http://www.leobudwelch.com
https://www.facebook.com/leobud.welch

Keep up with Foxfire Ranch:
http://www.foxfireranch.com
https://www.facebook.com/foxfireranch2008

Keep up with Fat Possum Records & Big Legal Mess Music:

Home


https://www.facebook.com/FatPossumRecords



https://fatpossumrecords.bandcamp.com
http://biglegalmessrecords.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Big-Legal-Mess-Records/134672929932373

Cedric Burnside's Hill Country Blues at Memphis' @LevittShell


R. L. Burnside was one of the most famous musicians in the blues tradition of the North Mississippi Hill Country, and many of his children and grandchildren have carried on that great tradition, including Cedric Burnside, a grandson of the late R.L. who is accomplished on both the guitar and the drums. After coming to prominence as part of a duo with another Mississippi bluesman, Lightning Malcolm, he more recently has formed a band called the Cedric Burnside Project, which is really just him on drums and Trenton Ayers on guitar (I suspect that Trenton Ayers is kin to the older Marshall County bluesman Little Joe Ayers). On Saturday June 21, Cedric brought his music to the Levitt Shell in Memphis’ Overton Park, and an overflow crowd despite hit and run showers early in the evening. Beginning on acoustic guitar, Burnside soon switched to drums, and performed most of the Hill Country standards, including “Coal Black Mattie”, “Don’t Let My Baby Ride”, and even the late Junior Kimbrough’s “Meet Me In The City.” It was a great evening of great Mississippi blues.