A Taste of The Gulf Coast In Somerville At Big Fish

Somerville, Tennessee is not exactly close to the Gulf of Mexico, and yet the new Big Fish restaurant at Highway 64 and Jernigan Drive effectively creates the ambiance of a waterfront seafood restaurant in Destin or Panama City Beach. The restaurant, built by an architecht around his formerly-mobile food truck, has only outdoor seating, but the dining area is covered with a sort of roof, and the whole area is attractively landscaped in a way that suggests the beach is not far away. On my first afternoon visit, great New Orleans music was playing over the loudspeakers. I had come with the intent of trying a shrimp po-boy, but I was soon intrigued by the special, a Surf ‘N Turf Burger. This proved to be a 100% Black Angus burger, topped with cheese, lobster, shrimp and crab. It would have normally been topped with cole slaw as well, but I am not a fan of cole slaw and asked them to omit it. As strange as the concept might sound, the Surf ‘N Turf burger was absolutely amazing, and a decent value at $8.99. It came with equally delicious french fries. The weather was pleasant, and at my table, it was easy to forget Highway 64 off to the north, or the shopping center across the street at my back. It felt like being in Florida. I finished off my meal with a slice of key lime pie, which was also delicious. I don’t think it is made in-house, but it is still really good. Unfortunately, on a more recent visit, the food was still amazingly good, but the owners told me that they will be closing at the end of October. With no indoor dining options, I had wondered how they would deal with the onset of cold weather, and what I learned is that they had decided to close altogether, during which time they will be renovating an old house on the premises. The project will result in an indoor dining area, and should be completed by April of 2019, at which time they plan to reopen. In the meanwhile, I strongly recommend that you get out to Big Fish for at least one last time here in October before they close for the winter.

Big Fish

30 Jernigan Dr

Somerville, TN 38068

(901) 650-2553

The Tennessee Delta V: Fayette County

On a Friday evening, after meeting a friend for dinner in Memphis, with nothing in particular to do, I headed out Poplar Avenue through Collierville and into Fayette County, which is the Tennessee county that most resembles the Mississippi Hill Country. Mississippi Fred McDowell was from Fayette County (Rossville to be exact), and if there is any fife and drum activity left in Tennessee (and there does not seem to be), it would likely be in that county. So I often venture out there to ride the backroads, take photographs, and see if I come upon any events, or flyers announcing events on the various stores along the roads. People in Fayette tend to be old-school and don’t use social media much to promote blues or gospel events. 

One of the reasons that this has taken on such urgency with me is that the western portion of Fayette County is undergoing a process of suburbanization, as people move away from Memphis into the country. The resulting growth and subdividing has the net effect of destroying historic locations and buildings, so I want to photograph what is still around while I can. 

Posters on the outside of stores in Rossville and Moscow announced a barbecue festival in Rossville and a car show in Somerville, as well as a Jubilee Hummingbirds concert at a church south of Moscow in Slayden, Mississippi. There was a also a poster announcing some kind of rap show at Saine’s, which is ordinarily a blues club. Signs along Highway 57 also announced that Terry Saine, the club’s owner, was running for the state legislature. 

Out on the Cowan Loop between Moscow and LaGrange, I came to an old and somewhat historic-looking church called Anderson Grove. The place, set far back off the road in a grove, looked almost abandoned, but the area was fairly peaceful. Further west along the same road was another church, obviously abandoned, with no sign to indicate what its name might have been. Not far away, back on Highway 57 was an abandoned grocery store that must have at one time been a bustling place indeed. But I found no evidence of juke joints, ball fields or picnic spots.

North of Moscow, along Highway 76, I came to Saine’s Blues Club, and stopped there, in the hopes of perhaps catching up with Terry Saine. Saine was a civil rights activist in the 1960’s, and in my belief likely old enough to have been aware of Black fife and drum bands in Fayette County during his youth, and perhaps also able to fill in some gaps about the Fayette County blues musician Lattie Murrell. But Saine was not there, perhaps out campaigning for office, so I headed on into Somerville. 

There, around the square, young people were setting up stages, booths and barricades, getting ready for the Cotton Festival, which was to be held the next day. Nothing was going on at the moment however, so I headed over to Betty’s After Dark blues club, but found it fairly quiet, although open. They were having a large T. K. Soul show the next night, after the Southern Heritage Classic game in Memphis. Nearby, however, was a restaurant with outdoor tables and colorful lights, that seemed to be packed with people. It  looked like something transported from Destin or Orange Beach to Somerville, and proved to be a new seafood restaurant called Big Fish that I realized will deserve a future visit. 

On out Highway 59, Fayette-Ware High School was clearly playing a football game at their stadium, but I wasn’t particularly interested in that, and I headed on to Brewer Road where I knew there was a club. But all I found was a group of young people at the end of the road on four-wheelers just hanging out, and if there was anything going on at the club, it was obviously a hip-hop event geared to youth.

Likewise at Mason, the Log Cabin and Blue Room had large crowds, but just DJ’s as best I could tell, and by now I was thoroughly tired. So I gave up looking for anything to get into and began driving back toward Bartlett on Highway 70, as lightning and rain began to develop.