A Friday Evening In Como

I had a vacation day from work, and early in the day, I saw a Facebook post from my favorite coffee brand, Southern Coffee Services in Lexington, Mississippi, which said that their products were now available at the Piggly Wiggly store in Batesville, Mississippi, which is about 35 miles closer to my house than the store in Grenada where I had gotten some last time. So in the afternoon, I decided to drive down to Batesville and pick up some bags of coffee, and then, after debating where I wanted to eat dinner, I decided to drive back up to Como and grab a dinner at Windy City Grill.

Como, Mississippi has a special vibe to it. It has always been a unique place in my experience, perhaps because for a long time Tate County did not allow any liquor, and Panola County did, so restaurants located in Como instead of Senatobia. Como’s Main Street is not only historic, but something of a destination, with five great restaurants, a hotel, an antique mall, an art studio, and an event hall for rental which is the scene of many a wedding.

After shooting some photographs with my iPhone in the gathering dusk, I sat down to a thin-crust pepperoni and bacon pizza, which was so much food that I could not finish it. I asked for a box, and took the rest of it by blues musician R. L. Boyce’s house for him to enjoy.

It was a fun evening in one of my favorite places.

A Friday Night in Nashville

After a day of research on my thesis in the Tennessee State Archives, I decided to enjoy my Friday night in Nashville. I headed first out to the new location of Grimey’s Records on the north side of Nashville in a former church. After many years on South Eighth Avenue near The Basement, they had decided to move to larger digs, and were taking advantage of the extra space to have live music performances in the store. I spent an hour or so there, but ended up not buying anything. Although it was beginning to rain, I decided to head to Nicky’s Coal-Fired Pizza in a neighborhood called The Nations where the streets are named for states. In my youth, this had been a rather rough neighborhood called West Nashville, not far from the Tennessee State University campus, but now it has been reborn into a trendy and hip district full of cafes and bars. Although I had enjoyed pizza the night before, I was eager to compare Nicky’s to Emmy Squared, and while they were different, I liked Nicky’s quite a bit. My pepperoni, bacon and mushroom pizza was quite delicious, and the space was cozy and inviting on a rather chilly, rainy evening. Just down Centennial Boulevard from Nicky’s I found a new coffee bar called White Bison Coffee, which was full of glass, chrome and white tables. It wasn’t particularly busy, but I had a delicious latte there, and a chocolate chocolate chip muffin.

Afterwards, my homeboy Otis Logan was supposed to be playing drums at a bar in East Nashville on Gallatin Avenue called The Cobra, so I headed up there, but the rain was growing worse. I kicked it with Otis for a minute, but the group he was supposed to play with wasn’t going on stage until 10 PM, and I had decided to drive back to Memphis, since the weather wasn’t getting any better, and since staying over would have led to me simply spending more money. So I left out, somewhat reluctantly, and got on the Interstate to head back home. But I accomplished what I had come for, and had a bit of fun as well.

A Rainy Night in the New Nashville

I drove up to Nashville on a Thursday night so that I could spend Friday in the Tennessee State Archives doing research for my masters’ thesis, but the weather was a complete wash-out, with rain that would not stop all the way from Memphis to Nashville.

Tennessee’s capital is in the middle of an unprecedented growth spurt, and its downtown in particular is becoming a city that I hardly recognize anymore. The rain was making things particularly difficult, but I recalled reading about a place that served Detroit-style pizza in Nashville, so I looked it up on my phone, and found it. The little bar was in a neighborhood called the Gulch, and was called Emmy Squared. It proved to be a Nashville branch of a New York City chain, and although I was wet and chilled after running from the parking garage to the bar, the interior was cozy, warm and inviting. The pizza proved to be quite expensive, but very delicious, and worth the cost.

Afterwards, I wanted dessert, and to my surprise, I saw on my phone that Nashville has gotten a location of Cafe Intermezzo, my favorite dessert place in Atlanta. Getting there was difficult to say the least, but after running in the rain, I came to a place with a huge Lavazza Coffee sign, but that turned out to be a completely different place, a late-night eatery called The Diner, which looked inviting. The Nashville location of Intermezzo turned out to be in the next block of Demonbreun Street, and was slightly smaller than its Atlanta counterparts, but it had the same excellent desserts and coffees. Being a huge Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup fan, I chose a chocolate and peanut butter cheesecake, and had a chocolate peanut butter latte as well! It was the perfect follow-up to my dinner. Then, with the rain continuing, I headed back to my Air BnB to call it a night. This is certainly not the Nashville I knew in my younger days!

Gourmet Pizza Comes To Bartlett at Pizza Social


Do-it-yourself pizza boutiques using the “Subway” model have become all the rage recently, and they seem to be popping up everywhere in and around Memphis. From the days when Pyro’s was the only game in town, we have Pizza Rev in East Memphis and Rise Pies in Southaven and now Pizza Social in Bartlett. On a recent visit, I was impressed with the atmosphere and decor of Pizza Social. It is bigger than Pyro’s and has more table space, as well as an outdoor patio area. The prices are about a dollar higher for pizzas, but there are more topping options, and I was altogether happier with my pizza. Of course there are trade-offs. Pizza Social does not have the cool Coca-Cola Freestyle machine that Pyro’s has, opting for a regular drink fountain such as you might see in a convenience store, nor do they have the large selection of local beers or artisan coffee drinks that Pyro’s features. But for convenience, shorter lines and more satisfying pizza, Pizza Social will continue to be my go-to when I want pizza in the future.

Pizza Social
3000 Kirby-Whitten Rd
Bartlett, TN 38134
(901) 779-2991
http://pizzasocial.pizza

Oak Street, New Orleans, Sunday Afternoon on Mardi Gras weekend


Although New Orleans is my favorite city, and it was Mardi Gras weekend, we were in town primarily for a Duwayne Burnside concert that I was playing keyboards on, so we didn’t have the opportunity to really get out and enjoy the parades or other performances. In fact, the parades ended up being more of a bother, as they made it hard for us to get from our condominium to the venue. But where we were staying, on Oak Street, was remarkably quiet and empty on the Sunday afternoon, apparently because everyone was further down St. Charles along the parade route. The holiday also wreaked havoc on our food options, with some places closed altogether and others on three-hour waits. But Pizza Domenica is a great stand-by, as it is just about the best pizza in the city anyway, and usually open even on Sunday or at Mardi-Gras. When we arrived, it was largely empty, but after we were seated, it started quickly filling up with people who were making their way back from the parade, and the place went from dead to crowded in less than a half hour, but we were satisfied and comfortable as we headed to the show venue.

Live Jazz on Sundays at Midtown Crossing Grill

2016-11-13 Jazz at Midtown Crossing Grill2016-11-13 Jazz at Midtown Crossing Grill2016-11-13 Jazz at Midtown Crossing Grill2016-11-13 Jazz at Midtown Crossing Grill2016-11-13 Jazz at Midtown Crossing Grill2016-11-13 Jazz at Midtown Crossing Grill2016-11-13 Jazz at Midtown Crossing Grill1417 Kelvin & Company1418 Kelvin & Company1419 Jazz at Midtown Crossing1420 Jazz at Midtown Crossing
Jazz is not an immensely popular music style in Memphis, so opportunities to hear authentic jazz in our city are few and far between, but some local jazz musicians are branching out and starting their own events. Recently, jazz saxophonist Kelvin Walters and drummer James Sexton have started holding jam sessions on Sunday evenings from 5-8 PM on the first three Sundays of each month at the Midtown Crossing Grill in the burgeoning Crosstown neighborhood one block over from the venerable Hi-Tone Cafe. The building where the grill is located has been all kinds of things, once having been home to Bobby Q’s barbecue restaurant and later Foxcee’s Sports Bar. As a jazz venue, it has the necessary intimacy, and despite its small stage area, it functions fairly well. Walters is at a young age already a decent saxophonist, and James Sexton is one of the city’s best drummers, and the jam session format gives young musicians from Memphis an opportunity to hone their skills in a performance setting in front of an actual crowd. As for the food offerings, the Midtown Crossing Grill has artisan pizzas, and they are pretty decent and reasonably priced. The jam session is not held on the fourth Sunday so as to not conflict with the monthly Sax on Sundays event at Neil’s out in East Memphis, which is another opportunity to hear jazz in Memphis. Take advantage of these events and enjoy.

Midtown Crossing Grill
394 N Watkins
Memphis, TN 38104
(901) 443-0502
http://www.midtowncrossingmemphis.com

Jazz is held on the first three Sundays of each month from 5-8 PM.

Artisan Wood-Fired Pizzas At Little Rock’s Raduno

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

The Italian word “raduno” refers to a gathering, and everyone knows that pizzas are a favorite party food. So Little Rock’s new Raduno Brick Oven in the trendy South Main entertainment district next to the venerable South on Main is a great place for friends and family to gather around great food and drink. Although the concept of wood-fired pizzas is not as new to Little Rock as other cities, Raduno offers a more upscale environment for its artisan pizzas, a sleek, modernistic look with plenty of artwork on the walls, and electronic dance music playing in the background. The fairly diverse menu features weekend brunch, soups, salads, a small assortment of Italian sandwiches, and of course, pizzas, which are the restaurant’s signature. My thin-crust pepperoni was more than enough for one person, and absolutely delicious. Prices, while not cheap, were reasonable, and service pleasant, prompt and efficient. Raduno is definitely worth a visit when in Little Rock. Highly recommended.

Raduno Brick Oven & Barroom
1318 S Main St
Little Rock, AR 72202
(501) 374-7476
http://radunolr.com

A King Biscuit Daybook: Mookie Cartwright & Friends on Cherry Street

New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos
New photo by John Shaw / Google Photos

After the Rebirth Brass Band performance, I walked back through the crowds on Cherry Street in downtown Helena. Many of the vendors were beginning to take down their displays for the night, but there was still a lot going on. At an outdoor performance spot, a group of younger blues musicians was performing, and it was actually really good music. A sign nearby explained that the group was Mookie Cartwright, Josh Parks and Friends. I am not sure who any of them were, but presumably, they are local Helena area artists. After checking them out for a moment, I stopped in Southbound Pizza nearby for a pepperoni and bacon pie before making the drive back to Memphis.

Hipness, Great Food and A Celebration of Sun Ra in Birmingham’s Avondale District

001 Post Office Pies002 Saw's Soul Kitchen003 Saw's Soul Kitchen004 Post Office Pies005 Saturn006 Avondale007 Post Office Pies008 Saw's Soul Kitchen009 Avondale Brewing Company010 Satellite Coffee Bar011 Satellite Coffee Bar012 Satellite Coffee Bar013 41st Street Pub014 Satellite Coffee Bar015 Satellite Coffee Bar
Prior to 2015, I had never heard of the Avondale neighborhood in Birmingham, but on my way to Atlanta for Thanksgiving, I noticed that the Yelp app on my phone was showing a number of restaurants on 41st Street in that area, so I decided to head there for lunch, to a pizza place called Post Office Pies. To my surprise, the area proved to be a district of restaurants and coffee bars, and there were a lot of choices. Despite originally deciding on pizza, I was extremely tempted by the oil drum barbecue in front of Saw’s Soul Kitchen next door, and the weather was so warm that people were sitting at the outdoor tables there. But I ultimately went ahead with my original pizza choice, and was quite pleased with the pepperoni and bacon pizza I enjoyed at Post Office Pies.
After lunch, I spied a coffee bar across the street called Satellite, which was attached to a music venue called Saturn. Inside was the last thing I would have expected- a wall display of Sun Ra album covers, although I finally remembered that Herman “Sonny” Blount was indeed born in Birmingham. The coffee there was great, the atmosphere cheerful, a great place for an after-lunch latte before continuing on my journey. Altogether, Avondale seems to be becoming a hip place for food and fun in Alabama’s largest city.

Post Office Pies
209 41st St S
Birmingham, AL 35222
(205) 599-9900

Saw’s Soul Kitchen
214 41st St S
Birmingham, AL 35222
(205) 591-1409

Saturn Birmingham/Satellite Coffee Bar
200 41st St S
Birmingham, AL 35222
(205) 703-9545

Grambling Homecoming 2015: And The Rains Came

1948 Lea's of Lecompte1949 Waterfront Grill1950 Waterfront Grill
When I got up early for breakfast on Grambling’s Homecoming Day, the weather was grey, but it wasn’t raining, so I was hopeful as I went to Lea’s of LeCompte in Monroe for breakfast. But no sooner had I left Monroe headed toward Ruston than the rains came down fiercely, and it was a cold and miserable rain at that. Even though I made my way to the area of Grambling where the parade was to begin, I could not find any place to park, and the rains were coming down so heavily that I decided to forego the parade and head to the Lincoln Parish Library in Ruston instead to do some historical research. About noon or so, I left the library, but the rains were continuing, so I headed over to Johnny’s Pizza House on Cooktown Road for a pizza buffet lunch. After that, it was still raining, and evident that the storms were not going to let up enough to let me attend the football game. I had no umbrella, no raincoat and no poncho. So I headed back to West Monroe, visiting the antique malls along Trenton Street, but really not finding much of anything of value. At dinner time, I headed to the Waterfront Grill, my favorite restaurant in Monroe, for a shrimp dinner, and then headed back over to Grambling to briefly hang out with my friend Dr. Reginald Owens, a journalism professor on the faculty at Louisiana Tech. But the rainy day had also been election day, so he had to go and comfort his cousin, who had lost his campaign for the Lincoln Parish Police Jury. Even worse, David Vitter had won the primary for governor, and was attacking his opponent on television as a proxy for Barack Obama. Altogether, it was a thoroughly depressing day.