TBC Brass Band Brings The Seventh Ward Funk Rolling Downtown With Revolution SA & PC

001 Treme002 Treme Coffeehouse003 Treme004 New Breed Brass Band005 Rampart Street006 TBC Brass Band007 TBC Brass Band008 TBC Brass Band009 TBC Brass Band010 TBC Brass Band011 Revolution 2015012 TBC Brass Band013 TBC Brass Band014 Revolution & TBC015 Revolution & TBC016 Revolution & TBC017 Revolution & TBC018 Revolution & TBC019 Revolution020 Revolution & TBC021 Revolution 2015022 Revolution 2015023 On Horseback024 Basin Street025 Basin Street026 Revolution & TBC027 Revolution & TBC028 Revolution & TBC029 Revolution 2015030 Revolution 2015031 Revolution & TBC032 Revolution 2015033 Orleans Avenue034 Revolution 2015035 Carver Theater036 Carver Theater037 Revolution 2015038 Revolution 2015039 Orleans Avenue040 The New Breed Brass Band041 Revolution 2015042 Revolution & The New Breed Brass Band043 Revolution 2015044 Revolution 2015045 Revolution & TBC046 Orleans Avenue047 Revolution & TBC048 Neutral Ground on Broad049 Broad Street Ruler050 Broad Street051 Revolution & TBC052 Broad Street053 Broad Street054 Broad Street055 Positive Vibrations056 Revolution 2015057 TBC Brass Band058 TBC Brass Band059 TBC Brass Band060 TBC Brass Band061 TBC Brass Band062 Revolution 2015063 Revolution 2015064 Revolution 2015065 Broad Street066 Broad Street067 Broad Street068 Broad Street069 Broad Street070 Revolution 2015071 Revolution 2015072 Revolution 2015073 Revolution 2015074 On Horseback Under The Arches075 On Horseback at McDonalds076 Revolution 2015077 Revolution 2015078 Revolution 2015079 Revolution 2015080 TBC Brass Band081 The Duck Off082 Revolution 2015083 TBC Brass Band084 Groove City085 A P Tureaud086 A P Tureaud087 Revolution 2015088 Under The Claiborne Bridge089 Claiborne Avenue090 Mother-In-Law Lounge091 Revolution 2015092 North Claiborne093 Revolution 2015094 Revolution 2015095 Revolution 2015096 St. Bernard Avenue097 St. Bernard Avenue098 St. Bernard Avenue099 St. Bernard Avenue100 St. Bernard Avenue101 St. Bernard Avenue102 Revolution 2015103 St. Bernard Avenue104 The Next Stop Bar105 Revolution 2015106 The Other Place107 The Other Place108 St. Bernard Avenue116 After The Second-Line Downtown117 After The Second-Line118 After The Second-Line119 After The Second-Line
Perhaps no New Orleans experience is more enjoyable yet exotic as the Sunday afternoon parades called second-lines. Inspired by the bass-drum, cowbell and tuba-driven grooves of a brass band, the second-line is basically a rolling party led by one of the many social aid and pleasure clubs in the Black community of New Orleans. Unlike more traditional parades elsewhere in the United States, these are participatory events. People come off their porches and fall in behind the marching band, or jump onto high places to dance and be noticed. The refreshments roll too, pulled by vendors with coolers on wheels, so with the music and cold drinks easily available, the average second-liner might not even realize that he’s been marching and buckjumping for nearly four hours in the hot New Orleans sun. Plus, unlike other parades, second-lines stop. The sponsoring club needs to rest, as some of the members are not young, and besides, they are usually dressed in elaborate and beautiful costumes that are extremely hot to wear. They also need to salute other clubs by visiting the bars where they hang out, so a second-line is everything- the beat of great music, the exuberance of impromptu dancing, the colorful brilliance of suits and costumes, the joyful meeting of friends or relatives, and ultimately a statement of identity- what it means to be from New Orleans.
On this particular Saturday, the second-line was being sponsored by the Revolution Social Aid & Pleasure Club, a downtown organization, so the parade lined up at the entrance to Louis Armstrong Park in the Treme neighborhood. Normally, that wouldn’t have been a big deal, but the Congo Square Rhythm Festival was going on inside the park, so there was quite a crowd in the vicinity. Revolution is one of the bigger parades of the season, and this year, it featured three bands- the TBC Brass Band, the Sons of Jazz and the New Breed Brass Band, which had formerly been known as the Baby Boyz. With a 70% chance of rain predicted, I had been concerned about the weather. It was certainly grey and overcast, and as the parade began to get underway, big drops of rain came falling down, sending a rush of people into the Ace Hardware on Rampart Street to buy ponchos and umbrellas. But once the parade was up and rolling on Basin Street, the rain abruptly ended, never to return, and eventually, up on Broad Street the sun came out. The crowds grew steadily bigger through the afternoon as we headed down Broad Street toward A. P. Tureaud. At one stop along the way, the club members disappeared into a building, and then came out in completely different attire. Since there had been no “coming out the door” at the beginning of the parade, this was their first “coming out” of the day. All downtown second-lines get kicked up a notch when they hit the I-10 overpass at North Claiborne Avenue. For one thing, the acoustics under the bridge are amazing, and the bass drums and tuba lines seem to hit harder, and the dancers get more creative. For another, there’s usually a crowd of people gathered under the bridge awaiting the arrival of the second-line. The neutral ground of Claiborne was a place of significance in Black New Orleans before the interstate was built, and the ground remains important to the community today, even in spite of what has been done to it. Outside of some establishments were large groups of people, particularly at Kermit Ruffin’s Mother-In-Law Lounge near the intersection with St. Bernard Avenue. On the last stretch of parade down St. Bernard Avenue, there was some question as to whether we would be allowed to continue, because the parade had run past its permitted time of 5 PM, but the police finally relented and allowed the parade to continue to its end.
Second-line crowds are always reluctant to disperse, and that is even more true of the ones downtown. Lots of people come out with custom cars and motorcycles, cruising up and down North Claiborne Avenue, despite the efforts of the police to break it up. An hour later, there was still a street party in full swing under the bridge. As the sun sets, it gradually breaks up naturally most of the time, the revelers headed home tired but happy until the whole process is repeated the next Sunday.
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