R. L. Boyce and the Hill Country Blues at Como, Mississippi

001 Sherena's Party002 Sherena's Party003 Sherena's Party004 Sherena's Party005 Sherena Boyce006 Sherena's Party007 R.L. Boyce & Band008 R.L. Boyce009 R.L. Boyce010 Drummer Cam011 Keyboard Player012 Drummer Cam013 R.L. Boyce014 Keyboard Player015 Drummer Cam016 Drummer017 Drummer018 Cam on Guitar019 Drummer020 Drummer021 Joyce Jones022 Cam on Guitar023 Sherena's Party024 Joyce Jones & R. L. Boyce025 Joyce Jones026 Dancers027 Joyce Jones028 Cam on Drums029 R. L. Boyce030 Dancer031 R.L. Boyce032 Keyboard Player033 Drummer034 Drummer035 R.L. Boyce036 Dancers
Como, Mississippi is a town of significant importance when it comes to the Hill Country style of blues, and it is a town that has had something of a nightlife renaissance in recent years, with several regionally-acclaimed restaurants, so it is somewhat surprising that live blues is considerably rare in Como. After all, this was the home of Mississippi Fred McDowell, and the town where the Rev. Robert Wilkins and the Rev. John Wilkins preached and played their unique style of blues-inflected gospel. But aside from the occasional recording sessions at Delta Recording Service, I had never seen any live blues in Como, so when Sherena Boyce invited me to her birthday party and said that her dad, legendary bluesman R. L. Boyce would be playing, I made plans to go.
Her party was held at a little building called the Back Street Ballroom on the street immediately behind Main Street. Although the building was more of an event rental venue, it had the look of a typical Mississippi juke, particularly inside. Friends and family gathered, and a few fans of R. L. Boyce as well, and the event soon got underway, with R. L. Boyce playing the guitar, backed by a band from Potts Camp in Marshall County whose name was never mentioned. It was a versatile band, however, because its keyboard player at one point switched to drums, and its drummer also played guitar and sang. After a few songs, a female singer named Joyce Jones came up and performed several more tunes, and the floor filled up with dancers, many exhibiting the same kind of moves that I had seen the weekend before at the second-line in New Orleans. Also reminiscent of the second-line culture was the fact that at least one party-goer had brought a tambourine with them that they beat and shook in time to the band on stage. After two sets of live music from the band, the DJ picked back up with southern soul and blues music, and the party kept going strong until 2 AM.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ad_RJSlQVrg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cU7VdvLc8vQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jnPtD0zSyA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F19I4FhjPu4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8d_Dw3WHUI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IY7y02wi6i0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWEQsdQvbC4

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