The Rebirth of Jazz on Beale Street at The Blue Note: A Tribute to Emerson Able

001 Memphis Jazz All-Stars002 Sidney Kirk003 Bill Hurd & Sidney Kirk Jr004 Ralph Collier005 Ralph Collier007 Ralph Collier, Bill Hurd & Sidney Kirk Jr008 Mickey Gregory & Sidney Kirk009 Emerson Able Tribute010 Mickey Gregory011 Mickey Gregory012 Mickey Gregory013 Johnny Yancey014 Kelvin015 Ralph Collier016 Sidney Kirk Jr017 Ralph Collier & Mickey Gregory018 Bill Hurd Quartet020 Johnny Yancey & Kevin021 Blue Note022 Blue Note
Jazz is the forgotten piece of the Memphis music puzzle. People who are familiar with Isaac Hayes, Al Green or Otis Redding have likely never heard of Frank Strozier, Booker Little, Joe Dukes, Jamil Nasser, Sonny Criss, Charles Lloyd, Harold Mabern or Phineas Newborn Jr. Yet the histories of jazz, blues and soul are interwoven in Memphis. A young Phineas Newborn Jr played on some of the early Sun blues records. Free jazz saxophonist Frank Lowe played with Con-Funk-Shun in the early 1970’s. Isaac Hayes’ first LP was a jazz trio record with Duck Dunn and Al Jackson Jr, and elements of jazz would be present in all his career. Much of our city’s jazz history springs from one particular high school, Manassas High School in North Memphis, which was home to Jimmie Lunceford, Jimmy Crawford, Frank Strozier, Booker Little, Harold Mabern and George Coleman, and much of that great legacy was the result of an incredible musician and band director, Emerson Able, who recently passed away. So when Johnny Yancey told me that there would be a jam session at the Blue Note on Beale Street in honor of Mr. Able, I decided to head down there, and found the club filled to overflowing. An all-star group of musicians was on stage, including Bill Hurd on saxophone, Sidney Kirk Sr. on piano, Sidney Kirk Jr on drums, Ralph Collier, Johnny Yancey and Mickey Gregory on trumpets and others. At least part of the purpose was to raise funds for instruments for the Manassas band program, and if it proved nothing else, the amazing Thursday night of music proved that Memphians will turn out to support authentic jazz in an accessible, welcoming environment. The jam sessions will continue to be held on the first Thursday of each month.

Blue Note Bar & Grill
341 Beale St
Memphis, TN 38103
(901) 577-8387
http://bluenotebarandgrillinc.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2n9b7Gf1Wg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyfCcEHb2FE

One Reply to “The Rebirth of Jazz on Beale Street at The Blue Note: A Tribute to Emerson Able”

  1. I have stopped in the Blue Note and was astonished at the amazing talent that this venue offers. These musicians can flat out play. And they play for the love of music, not for a paycheck. If you love blues, you need to stop by the Blue Note Bar & Grill.

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