Breeze Cayolle and The Mighty Souls Brass Band at Lafayette’s

001 Lafayette's Music Room002 Lafayette's Music Room003 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans004 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans005 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans006 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans007 Breeze Cayolle008 Breeze Cayolle009 Tim Goodwin010 Tony Thomas011 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans012 Breeze Cayolle & Tim Goodwin013 Breeze Cayolle014 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans015 Breeze Cayolle016 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans017 Breeze Cayolle018 Breeze Cayolle019 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans020 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans021 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans022 Breeze Cayolle & Tim Goodwin023 Mighty Souls Brass Band024 Mighty Souls Brass Band025 Mighty Souls Brass Band026 Mighty Souls Brass Band027 Mighty Souls Brass Band028 Mighty Souls Brass Band029 Mighty Souls Brass Band030 Mighty Souls Brass Band031 Mighty Souls Brass Band032 Mighty Souls Brass Band033 Mighty Souls Brass Band034 Mighty Souls Brass Band035 Mighty Souls Brass Band036 Mighty Souls Brass Band037 Mighty Souls Brass Band038 Mighty Souls Brass Band039 Mighty Souls Brass Band040 Mighty Souls Brass Band
Lafayette’s Music Room is a reincarnation of one of Memphis’ best-beloved music venues of the 1970’s, but the latter-day version has something of a New Orleans tinge, both with the cuisine and often with the music as well. This past Wednesday, both featured bands presented different aspects of the musical traditions of the Crescent City. Multi-reedist Breeze Cayolle, a distant relative of jazz great Sidney Bechet, has a group called New Orleans, whose musicians are ironically some of Memphis’ best-known jazz musicians, including Tony Thomas on piano, Tim Goodwin on bass and Tom Lonardo on drums. They play traditional New Orleans jazz, occasionally venturing into the world of jazz standards as well, and have developed a following at the weekly brunch at Owen Brennan’s in East Memphis. Some of that same crowd was in evidence Wednesday night, sitting at the tables nearest the stage and even getting up periodically to dance. Cayolle is a first-rate saxophonist and clarinetist, and he sings with a husky tone that exudes the flavor of New Orleans.
The Mighty Souls Brass Band on the other hand is something rather different, although they share Tom Lonardo with Breeze Cayolle’s group. The Mighty Souls take their cue from the brass band revivalism that started with the Dirty Dozen and the Rebirth in New Orleans, with the main difference being the occasional covers of Memphis soul tunes, such as Rufus Thomas’ “Memphis Train” or Willie Mitchell’s “20-75.” Like some New Orleans brass bands these days (notably the Stooges), the Mighty Souls replace the separate snare and bass drummer with a set drummer, and add a guitar, at least indoors, but there is a tuba and plenty of horns, and if they lack the hardcore street edge of the younger, Blacker bands in New Orleans, they compensate with consummate musicianship and plenty of good spirits. Although Memphis does not have a modern brass band tradition by any means (W. C. Handy notwithstanding), the MSBB has developed a very loyal following, and have released a debut CD called Lift Up Your Mighty Souls on the University of Memphis-related Blue Barrel label.



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