Highway 51 Revisited: Forgotten Towns in North Mississippi

001 Pope MS002 Pope MS003 Pope MS004 Pope MS005 Enid Music Hall006 Enid Music Hall007 Enid MS009 Bethany Baptist Church, Enid MS010 Bethany Baptist Church011 Bethany Baptist Church012 Bethany Baptist Church013 Bethany Baptist Church014 Enid MS015 Enid MS016 Enid MS019 Oakland MS020 Abandoned School021 Abandoned School
During the 1960’s, the new interstate highways began to bypass the old US highways and the towns along them, and gradually these towns began to fade into obscurity. But a trip along the old highways can be extremely rewarding, revealing ghost towns and historic buildings. On last Friday, August 1, I decided to make my trip to Jackson along Highway 51 from Batesville, and found some interesting and intriguing places. The tiny town of Pope, Mississippi in Panola County, aside from residences, was mainly one street along the railroad with a couple of old historic buildings, one of which had been turned into a restaurant called The Place, that looks as if it might warrant further investigation. But I was especially impressed with the town of Enid, from which Enid Lake draws its name although the lake and the town are in different counties. The town, in Tallahatchie County, seems barely above ghost town status these days, but its only remaining downtown building is now a performance space known as the Enid Music Hall, which features live music on weekends, often blues. On the other side of the railroad tracks was a very old wooden church, which certainly appears to be historic, although there is no historic marker. A sign on the building is rusted, but I could still make out that the building had been the Bethany Baptist Church. A nearby building looks as if it had been a one-room school, or perhaps an education building for the church. Down the road just below the city of Oakland, Mississippi, I came upon a large, abandoned school complex along Highway 51. With no signage there, I had no way of knowing what school it was, but I never fail to see these abandoned schools in Mississippi and Louisiana without being depressed. After all, these are poor states with great educational needs, and to see these taxpayer-funded investments rotting away in the Mississippi sun is not a good look at all.

One Reply to “Highway 51 Revisited: Forgotten Towns in North Mississippi”

  1. The churches in Enid are on right the Methodist on left the Presberterion the old store was Mitchell’s store. Sold everything from candy to coffins. The school in Oakland was Walker High. The black school before integration. Oakland High was in the town. A housing project sits there now. The store in Oakland is only one left. Used be long line of stores.

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