R. L. Boyce Brings The Hill Country To New Orleans

001 Sherena Boyce & Michael Bateman004 R. L. Boyce & Friends006 Sherena Boyce009 The Circle Bar010 Sherena Boyce & Amy Verdon013 R. L. Boyce015 R. L. Boyce016 R. L. Boyce017 R. L. & Sherena Boyce018 R. L. & Sherena Boyce019 R. L. & Sherena Boyce020 R.L. Boyce & Friends021 Sherena Boyce and Friends022 Sherena Boyce and Friends023 Sherena Boyce and Friends024 Sherena Boyce and Friends025 Sherena Boyce and Friends026 Sherena Boyce and Friends027 R. L. Boyce & Friends028 R. L. Boyce029 R. L. Boyce035 R. L. & Sherena Boyce036 R. L. & Sherena Boyce037 R. L. & Sherena Boyce and Friends038 R. L. & Sherena Boyce and Friends039 R. L. Boyce and Friends040 R. L. Boyce & Friends041 R. L. Boyce042 R. L. Boyce043 Sherena Boyce044 Sherena Boyce045 R. L. Boyce050 R. L. & Sherena Boyce052 R. L. & Sherena Boyce054 R. L. & Sherena Boyce056 R. L. Boyce057 Sherena & R. L. Boyce064 R. L. Boyce067 R. L. Boyce & Friends
It was perhaps a strange night for Hill Country blues in New Orleans. It was raining heavily. Mardi Gras parades had led to road closures and gridlock across portions of the city. And the NBA All-Star events were going on at the New Orleans Arena. But at the Circle Bar on St. Charles, a small crowd braved the rain and parade aftermath to enjoy the music of Hill Country legend R. L. Boyce, playing with a backing group of local New Orleans musicians. The Circle Bar, located on Lee Circle in the Warehouse District, is a very small venue which books a rather eclectic music schedule on a regular basis, with events ranging from classic rap and hip-hop DJ parties to Mississippi bluesmen like Boyce or Duwayne Burnside, New Orleans classic bands like the Iguanas, or rock groups. It doesn’t sell food, and has almost no room or parking, yet its music policy is free-wheeling and worth checking out. Despite the gloom of the rain, the crowd was in a festive and cheerful mood, many of them decorated with Mardi Gras beads, and some of them dancing to the trance-like grooves that Boyce played on his guitar. R. L. was joined by his daughter Sherena, who danced and played the tambourine, and with a guitarist, bassist and drummer. The show, having started at 11 PM, didn’t end until 2 AM.

Breeze Cayolle and The Mighty Souls Brass Band at Lafayette’s

001 Lafayette's Music Room002 Lafayette's Music Room003 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans004 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans005 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans006 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans007 Breeze Cayolle008 Breeze Cayolle009 Tim Goodwin010 Tony Thomas011 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans012 Breeze Cayolle & Tim Goodwin013 Breeze Cayolle014 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans015 Breeze Cayolle016 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans017 Breeze Cayolle018 Breeze Cayolle019 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans020 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans021 Breeze Cayolle & New Orleans022 Breeze Cayolle & Tim Goodwin023 Mighty Souls Brass Band024 Mighty Souls Brass Band025 Mighty Souls Brass Band026 Mighty Souls Brass Band027 Mighty Souls Brass Band028 Mighty Souls Brass Band029 Mighty Souls Brass Band030 Mighty Souls Brass Band031 Mighty Souls Brass Band032 Mighty Souls Brass Band033 Mighty Souls Brass Band034 Mighty Souls Brass Band035 Mighty Souls Brass Band036 Mighty Souls Brass Band037 Mighty Souls Brass Band038 Mighty Souls Brass Band039 Mighty Souls Brass Band040 Mighty Souls Brass Band
Lafayette’s Music Room is a reincarnation of one of Memphis’ best-beloved music venues of the 1970’s, but the latter-day version has something of a New Orleans tinge, both with the cuisine and often with the music as well. This past Wednesday, both featured bands presented different aspects of the musical traditions of the Crescent City. Multi-reedist Breeze Cayolle, a distant relative of jazz great Sidney Bechet, has a group called New Orleans, whose musicians are ironically some of Memphis’ best-known jazz musicians, including Tony Thomas on piano, Tim Goodwin on bass and Tom Lonardo on drums. They play traditional New Orleans jazz, occasionally venturing into the world of jazz standards as well, and have developed a following at the weekly brunch at Owen Brennan’s in East Memphis. Some of that same crowd was in evidence Wednesday night, sitting at the tables nearest the stage and even getting up periodically to dance. Cayolle is a first-rate saxophonist and clarinetist, and he sings with a husky tone that exudes the flavor of New Orleans.
The Mighty Souls Brass Band on the other hand is something rather different, although they share Tom Lonardo with Breeze Cayolle’s group. The Mighty Souls take their cue from the brass band revivalism that started with the Dirty Dozen and the Rebirth in New Orleans, with the main difference being the occasional covers of Memphis soul tunes, such as Rufus Thomas’ “Memphis Train” or Willie Mitchell’s “20-75.” Like some New Orleans brass bands these days (notably the Stooges), the Mighty Souls replace the separate snare and bass drummer with a set drummer, and add a guitar, at least indoors, but there is a tuba and plenty of horns, and if they lack the hardcore street edge of the younger, Blacker bands in New Orleans, they compensate with consummate musicianship and plenty of good spirits. Although Memphis does not have a modern brass band tradition by any means (W. C. Handy notwithstanding), the MSBB has developed a very loyal following, and have released a debut CD called Lift Up Your Mighty Souls on the University of Memphis-related Blue Barrel label.



Two Memphis Passions Come Together at Jerry Lawler’s BBQ

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Two things that practically rise to the level of religion in Memphis are professional wrestling and barbecue, so when a new establishment combines them in the way that King Jerry Lawler’s Memphis BBQ does, it immediately attracts a lot of attention. On the other hand, celebrity restaurants don’t exactly have a great track record. Minnie Pearl’s, Roy Rogers’, Mahalia Jackson’s, Arthur Treacher’s and Kenny Rogers’ all bit the dust after the newness wore off, and all too often, complaints about the food were cited as reasons for closure. After all, people go to a restaurant to eat.
That being said, I tried Jerry Lawler’s BBQ this past Friday night, and I was amazed with the experience. First, the decor will please any fan of Memphis wrestling, as there are historic photos, artifacts and posters on the wall, and a TV screen showing footage from classic bouts. Then the menu is diverse and very reasonably priced, featuring everything from pulled pork to beef brisket, to ribs, to smoked sausages. I opted for the pulled pork, and was amazed at the high quality of what I received. The meat was smoked and lightly seasoned with the dry rub used on the ribs, and then I was given a choice of no less than four barbecue sauces, which ranged from sweet to hot. All were delicious. As a side, I had the french fries, which were decent if not outstanding. Had I chosen to, I could have topped it all off with a brownie or other kind of dessert, but I was pleasantly full after finishing my dinner. My only disappointment was to see that the restaurant has a fairly early closing hour of 9 PM, even on Fridays and Saturdays. On the other hand, they are open seven days a week. I left pleased, and feel that Jerry Lawler’s BBQ can compete with any barbecue in the city of Memphis.

Jerry Lawler’s BBQ
465 North Germantown Pkwy, #116
Memphis, TN 38018
(901) 509-2360
https://jerrylawlerbbq.com