The next morning, Sunday, was shear pandemonium. It seemed that everybody was wearing Saints black-and-gold, and StubHub was selling tickets right in the hotel lobby. I could have gotten a game ticket for $28, but I decided that a football game could be watched on television, but an authentic New Orleans second-line couldn’t. So I walked around the corner to grab a breakfast at the Cafe on the Square, and soon Rico Brooks and his friend met me there for breakfast. The street outside was already lined with Saints fans getting ready to head to the Superdome. 

The next morning, Sunday, was shear pandemonium. It seemed that everybody was wearing Saints black-and-gold, and StubHub was selling tickets right in the hotel lobby. I could have gotten a game ticket for $28, but I decided that a football game could be watched on television, but an authentic New Orleans second-line couldn’t. So I walked around the corner to grab a breakfast at the Cafe on the Square, and soon Rico Brooks and his friend met me there for breakfast. The street outside was already lined with Saints fans getting ready to head to the Superdome. 

The next morning, Sunday, was shear pandemonium. It seemed that everybody was wearing Saints black-and-gold, and StubHub was selling tickets right in the hotel lobby. I could have gotten a game ticket for $28, but I decided that a football game could be watched on television, but an authentic New Orleans second-line couldn’t. So I walked around the corner to grab a breakfast at the Cafe on the Square, and soon Rico Brooks and his friend met me there for breakfast. The street outside was already lined with Saints fans getting ready to head to the Superdome. 

The Brass-A-Holics differ from most other New Orleans brass bands. They are not a marching unit, replacing the traditional drummers with a set drummer and a percussionist, and they incorporate elements of Washington DC go-go music into what they do. They are actually quite good and quite unique. 

The Brass-A-Holics differ from most other New Orleans brass bands. They are not a marching unit, replacing the traditional drummers with a set drummer and a percussionist, and they incorporate elements of Washington DC go-go music into what they do. They are actually quite good and quite unique. 

The Brass-A-Holics differ from most other New Orleans brass bands. They are not a marching unit, replacing the traditional drummers with a set drummer and a percussionist, and they incorporate elements of Washington DC go-go music into what they do. They are actually quite good and quite unique. 

After the end of the Los Hombres Calientes show, I walked up to Bourbon Street to head toward the Brass-a-Holics midnight show at Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse at the Royal Sonesta Hotel, but now there was a brass band playing in the street at Bourbon and Canal, not the To Be Continued Brass Band, but the Young Fellaz Brass Band, and they were quite good as well. 

After the end of the Los Hombres Calientes show, I walked up to Bourbon Street to head toward the Brass-a-Holics midnight show at Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse at the Royal Sonesta Hotel, but now there was a brass band playing in the street at Bourbon and Canal, not the To Be Continued Brass Band, but the Young Fellaz Brass Band, and they were quite good as well. 

After the end of the Los Hombres Calientes show, I walked up to Bourbon Street to head toward the Brass-a-Holics midnight show at Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse at the Royal Sonesta Hotel, but now there was a brass band playing in the street at Bourbon and Canal, not the To Be Continued Brass Band, but the Young Fellaz Brass Band, and they were quite good as well. 

The legendary percussionist Bill Summers had come up to the Cutting Edge conference, and had asked me to come to his Los Hombres Calientes gig at Irvin Mayfield’s new I Club at the J. W. Marriott Hotel on Canal Street. I did, and was absolutely amazed. I had not understood a few years back when I first heard about the group why New Orleans musicians would have formed a Latin jazz group, but Los Hombres Calientes demonstrate on their gigs the relationship between Cuban and New Orleans musics. By the time they ended their set with “Hey Pocky Way” and “Shoo Fly Don’t Bother Me”, the similarities of the two genres were obvious to everyone in the room. They are masterful performers.