Endings and Beginnings With Duwayne Burnside at The Shelter on Van Buren

001 Duwayne Burnside002 Artwork003 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell004 Duwayne Burnside005 Kenny Brown006 Sherena Boyce007 Duwayne Burnside008 Duwayne Burnside009 Duwayne Burnside010 Duwayne Burnside011 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell012 Kenny Brown013 Duwayne Burnside014 Duwayne Burnside017 Duwayne Burnside018 Tonight Duwayne Burnside019 Duwayne Burnside020 Duwayne Burnside021 Duwayne Burnside022 Duwayne Burnside023 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell024 Kenny Brown025 Duwayne BurnsideJPG026 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell027 Kenny Brown028 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce029 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce030 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce031 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce032 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce034 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce035 Duwayne Burnside036 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce037 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell038 Duwayne Burnside039 Duwayne Burnside040 Duwayne Burnside041 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell042 Duwayne Burnside043 Duwayne Burnside & Kody Harrell045 Kenny Brown046 Sherena Boyce047 R. L. Boyce & Duwayne Burnside048 R. L. Boyce & Kody Harrell049 R. L. Boyce050 R. L. Boyce052 R. L. Boyce053 R. L. Boyce & Kody Harrell054 R. L. Boyce055 R. L. Boyce056 Kenny Brown057 R. L. & Sherena Boyce058 R. L. & Sherena Boyce059 R. L. Boyce, Sherena Boyce & Kody Harrell060 Duwayne Burnside061 R. L. Boyce & Kody Harrell062 Duwayne Burnside063 Duwayne Burnside064 R. L. & Sherena Boyce065 R. L. & Sherena Boyce066 R. L. Boyce, Kody Harrell & Sherena Boyce067 Duwayne Burnside & R. L. Boyce068 Duwayne Burnside & R. L. Boyce069 R. L. & Sherena Boyce070 Duwayne Burnside & R. L. Boyce071 Duwayne Burnside, Kenny Brown & R. L. Boyce072 R. L. Boyce073 Duwayne Burnside & R. L. Boyce077 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce078 Duwayne Burnside & Sherena Boyce
Duwayne Burnside had played The Shelter on Van Buren in Oxford, Mississippi earlier in the fall, but I had not been able to attend, so when it was announced that he would be playing there again on New Years’ Eve, I was eager to be there. It would prove to be both my first, and sadly my last, visit to The Shelter.
The venue was a coffee bar and live music venue, which also served a very limited food menu, some desserts, and craft beer. The atmosphere was extremely laid back, with couches, benches, chairs and tables in a rather haphazard pattern near the stage. The night of Hill Country blues featured not only Duwayne Burnside but also Kenny Brown, and a few local Oxford musicians, including guitarist Kody Harrell. At first Duwayne’s drummer had not shown up, so he was playing a sort of “unplugged” acoustic set. After his drummer arrived, he picked up the pace and intensity level to an extent, and the moderate crowd in the seats loved every minute of it. Como bluesman R. L. Boyce then joined Duwayne on stage for a few songs, and some local musicians came up to sit end toward the show’s end. At 10 PM or so, Duwayne brought things to a halt, as he had another show at The Hut in Holly Springs starting at 11, and we all left in a happy frame of mind. Unfortunately, it would be the last time we got to visit The Shelter on Van Buren. A week into the new year, it abruptly closed for good.

R. L. Boyce & Lightnin Malcolm Live at Antone’s

1392 Austin106 R. L. Boyce & Stud107 Stud & Lightnin108 R. L. Boyce109 Sherena & Lightnin111 Sherena & Lightnin112 Sherena & Lightnin113 R. L & Sherena Boyce114 R. L. Boyce115 Sherena, Stud & Malcolm116 R. L., Sherena, Studd & MalcolmJPG117 Sherena & Lightnin118 R. L., Studd, Lightnin & Sherena119 R. L., Stud, Lightnin & Sherena120 Sherena & Lightnin121 Antone's122 Lightnin Malcolm123 Antone's124 Antone's126 R. L., Stud & Lightnin127 Lightnin & Sherena128 R. L. & Stud129 Antone's Schedule130 Antone's Marquis131 Stud & Lightnin132 Sherena & Lightnin133 Sherena & Lightnin134 Sherena Boyce & Lightnin Malcolm135 R. L. & Friend136 R. L. Boyce137 R. L. Boyce138 Sherena Boyce1410 Sherena in Austin
When a young Lebanese man from Port Arthur, Texas named Clifford Antone got kicked out (or perhaps dropped out, depending on who you ask) of the University of Texas after a marijuana arrest in 1970, it seemed like an end to a promising career. The Antone family were prominent businessmen in Houston, owning an import firm and a chain of sandwich shops that specialized in po-boys. Other young men might have fallen into a depression, or started on a downward spiral into harder drugs and ruin, but Clifford Antone decided to open a night club. Yet when Antone’s opened in 1975 on a then-moribund East Sixth Street in downtown Austin, it was hardly the kind of club that people would have expected success from, for it was a blues club, and the blues revival had fizzled out by the end of the 1960’s. Nor was Austin well-known for blues, despite a Texas blues legacy that was primarily centered around Houston. But all of the best names in blues from around the country played at Antone’s, and by the time of Clifford Antone’s death in 2006, his empire had added a record store and a record label as well. The record store belongs to other owners now, and the record label was sold to Warner Brothers after a bankruptcy, but the club, despite occasional closures and numerous relocations, remains the absolute best blues club in Texas, and probably one of the best blues clubs in the world. So it was quite an honor for Hill Country bluesman R. L. Boyce to be invited to play there, along with Marshall County bluesman Lightnin’ Malcolm, who has increased in popularity over the last several years. The club was packed to overflowing, despite the cold, rainy weather, and the crowd enjoyed every minute of the proceedings. The drum chair was held by the late T-Model Ford’s grandson Stud Ford, and R. L.’s daughter Sherena provided the juke joint dancing and played the tambourine. Seen in the crowd was noted music journalist Matt Sonzala. It was a great night indeed.

Coffee Gets A Lift At Waco’s BRU Artisan Coffee Works

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While traveling from Dallas to Austin in incessant rain, I decided I wanted some sort of coffee when we got to Waco. With Baylor University located there, I noticed several different coffee options on my phone, but opted for one called BRU Artisan Coffee Works on Franklin Avenue in the Praetorian Building in Downtown Waco. It was still raining when we arrived at the coffee house, and we were amazed to find that BRU occupies the old elevator shaft of the historic building, and otherwise shares space with Interior Glow, a home decorating and gift shop. We found that the barista was friendly, and the coffee amazingly good, just the thing to cheer us on a grey, rainy afternoon. BRU is somewhat off the beaten path, but worth a visit.

BRU Artisan Coffee Works
601 Franklin Avenue
Waco, TX 76701
(254) 307-8998
http://www.bruwaco.com
https://www.facebook.com/bruwaco/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE
https://www.instagram.com/bruwaco/

Exquisite Coffee Offerings at Birmingham’s Revelator Coffee Company

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Believe it or not, there was a time in my lifetime when espresso, cappuccino and other artisan coffees were just about impossible to obtain in the South. Certainly we could not find them anywhere in Memphis. There were no Starbucks locations, and few local coffee houses either. Only the biggest cities, such as Atlanta or Dallas had such places. Nowadays, the South is second only to the Pacific Northwest when it comes to artisan coffee, and the available choices can truly be bewildering, particularly in coffee-loving cities like Atlanta or New Orleans. New roasters seemingly pop up every day. But a young upstart, Birmingham’s Revelator Coffee Company, hopes to become the South’s coffee company, and with locations in New Orleans, Birmingham, Atlanta,Charleston, Chattanooga and Nashville, they are well on their way toward achieving that goal. Founded in New Orleans, Revelator decided fairly early to build a central roastery in Birmingham, Alabama, a city which is just now starting to undergo a renaissance, but which already had a history of love for coffee and a decent number of local coffee bars. On the Wednesday afternoon before Thanksgiving, I came off the road on my way to Atlanta to stop and purchase a couple of pounds of beans to take back home with me. Because the local coffee house and shop closes at 5 PM, I barely made it there before closing time, but the employees were gracious about serving me right at the close of the day, and even gave me a free cup of brewed coffee because I had purchased two bags of beans. I have to say that I was impressed with the sleek, futuristic look of the place, and was surprised that they had an electronic dance music DJ, particularly since they close at 5 in the evening. But the brewed coffee was delicious, and the Central American beans I bought (from Nicaragua and Costa Rica, as I recall) proved to be delicious as well once I brewed them back home in Memphis a few weeks later. One disappointment of mine, which I hope will eventually be corrected: While Revelator Coffee is available at Piggly Wiggly in Birmingham, it is not available anywhere in Memphis. Hopefully, they will either get it into some of our local supermarkets, or better yet, perhaps open a Revelator store here.

Revelator Coffee Company
1826 3rd Av N, #101
Birmingham, AL 35203
(205) 224-5900
http://revelatorcoffee.com
http://revelatorcoffee.com/locations/

Live Jazz on Sundays at Midtown Crossing Grill

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Jazz is not an immensely popular music style in Memphis, so opportunities to hear authentic jazz in our city are few and far between, but some local jazz musicians are branching out and starting their own events. Recently, jazz saxophonist Kelvin Walters and drummer James Sexton have started holding jam sessions on Sunday evenings from 5-8 PM on the first three Sundays of each month at the Midtown Crossing Grill in the burgeoning Crosstown neighborhood one block over from the venerable Hi-Tone Cafe. The building where the grill is located has been all kinds of things, once having been home to Bobby Q’s barbecue restaurant and later Foxcee’s Sports Bar. As a jazz venue, it has the necessary intimacy, and despite its small stage area, it functions fairly well. Walters is at a young age already a decent saxophonist, and James Sexton is one of the city’s best drummers, and the jam session format gives young musicians from Memphis an opportunity to hone their skills in a performance setting in front of an actual crowd. As for the food offerings, the Midtown Crossing Grill has artisan pizzas, and they are pretty decent and reasonably priced. The jam session is not held on the fourth Sunday so as to not conflict with the monthly Sax on Sundays event at Neil’s out in East Memphis, which is another opportunity to hear jazz in Memphis. Take advantage of these events and enjoy.

Midtown Crossing Grill
394 N Watkins
Memphis, TN 38104
(901) 443-0502
http://www.midtowncrossingmemphis.com

Jazz is held on the first three Sundays of each month from 5-8 PM.

Great Catfish and Live Music at Hernando’s Catfish Blues

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I love catfish, and I love blues music, so when a place puts them together, like Hernando, Mississippi’s new Catfish Blues restaurant, I am intrigued, to say the least. Because in its earliest days, the restaurant was running as a buffet only, I had held off on trying it, but finally my girlfriend and I decided we could delay no longer, and we were pleasantly pleased with what we found. Catfish Blues is located east of downtown Hernando, near the railroad tracks on Commerce Street in a building meant to resemble a train depot. The room is expansive and cheerful, with plenty of blues memorabilia on the walls, including pictures of North Mississippi stars like Duwayne Burnside and the Rev. John Wilkins, and there is plenty of room for live music, which typically happens on Saturdays. On the Friday night we visited, there was no live music, but the star of the show was catfish, which comes in two ways. The traditional catfish has the usual cornmeal batter, while the “Robert Pettiway” is a New Orleans-style breading which more resembles what you would get at Middendorf’s in Louisiana or Tug’s Casual Cafe in Memphis. Its name commemorates Robert Petway, the bluesman who first recorded the song “Catfish Blues.” Altogether we found the service cheerful and the prices fairly reasonable. If it wasn’t the absolute best catfish we had ever had, it was darn good, and overall a pleasant experience. We will certainly return.

Catfish Blues
210 E Commerce St, #8
Hernando, MS 38632
(662) 298-3814
http://catfishblues.com
https://www.facebook.com/Catfish-Blues-748897315241435/

A Death In The Delta: Tallulah’s Tragic Decline

053 Madison Alternative School054 Madison Middle School055 Madison Middle School056 Reuben McCall High School057 Reuben McCall High School058 Reuben McCall High School059 Reuben McCall High School060 Reuben McCall High School061 Reuben McCall High School062 Reuben McCall High School063 Forgotten Champs-Abandoned McCall Stadium064 Abandoned McCall Stadium065 Abandoned McCall Stadium066 Abandoned McCall Stadium067 Abandoned McCall Stadium068 Abandoned McCall Stadium069 Abandoned McCall Stadium070 Nobody in the Stands071 Returning to Nature072 No Score073 Vanishing Stands074 Twisted Goals075 The Pressbox076 Abandoned McCall Stadium077 West Green Street, Tallulah078 Honeybun's Funhouse Teen Center079 Honeybun's Funhouse Teen Center080 Sportsman's Club and Restaurant081 Hotel Watson082 Hotel Watson083 Hotel Watson084 Hotel Watson085 Wilmore's Lounge & Game Room086 The Hole in the Wall, Tallulah087 The Hole in the Wall, Tallulah088 Downtown Tallulah089 Downtown Tallulah090 Downtown Tallulah091 Snyder Street, Tallulah092 Downtown Tallulah093 Downtown Tallulah094 Downtown Tallulah095 Only Facades Remain096 Downtown Tallulah097 Downtown Tallulah098 Snyder Street Looking West099 Downtown Tallulah100 Downtown Tallulah101 Madison Parish Courthouse101 Madison Parish Courthouse103 The Tallulah Club104 Madison Parish Courthouse
In my childhood, Interstate 20 east ended at Waverly, Louisiana, which I remember as a railroad crossing with a store (where we would stop for refreshments) and a post office. From there we would have to take old Highway 80 into the town of Tallulah, Louisiana, as we journeyed toward my mother’s parents house in Gulfport, Mississippi, or sometimes to our family reunion in Jackson. I always liked Tallulah. It probably would have been around 1973, and I was six years old. Jean Knight’s “Mr. Big Stuff” would have been on the radio, or maybe Bread’s “Make It With You”, and I recall the brightly-lit multicolored Christmas trees in the bayou that bisected the little town. Everything seemed quiet and peaceful. Little did I know of another side to Tallulah, more wild and exuberant on the west side of the tracks. There along West Green Street, blues came from jukeboxes or on the bandstands at the Sportsman’s Club, the Fun House, the Green Lantern. Musicians were grabbing dinner at the Hotel Watson before heading to the gig. A few blocks to the north of Highway 80, perhaps the thunderous funk of drum cadences rocked Reuben McCall stadium, or the melodious sound of trumpets and trombones, as the neighborhood turned out for a football game. At the massive Chicago Mill and Lumber Company, a whistle sounded to mark the hustle and bustle of shift change. The West End of Tallulah was a world that six-year-old me knew nothing about.
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The first thing that I saw approaching Tallulah from the west along Highway 80 was the large, barb-wire-enclosed hulk of a prison looming to the right of the road. The Chicago Mill and Lumber Company had closed for good in 1983, but it had been laying off employees since the 1970’s. By 1994, with the town of Tallulah really desperate, town and state leaders announced the opening of a private juvenile prison which would provide badly needed jobs. But the Tallulah Correctional Center for Youth proved to be a disaster. Many of the jobs paid only $6 an hour. Two massive inmate riots occurred within the first two months the facility was open. And disturbing allegations of beatings, rapes and solitary confinement started to filter out from the institution. The state took control of the facility in 1999, but things improved little. The youth facility was closed in 2004, and then, against the wishes of Tallulah residents, it was converted into a prison for adults. It sits directly on the site of the lumber mill that was for so many years Tallulah’s largest employer.
In the neighborhood to the north of Highway 80 are many small, mostly well-kept homes, but interspersed with them are boarded-up school buildings. One of them, the Madison Alternative School is the former Madison Middle School, which before that was Reuben McCall Junior High School. It was abandoned when Madison Middle School was built next to the new Madison Parish High School far to the south along I-20. Further up, on Wyche Street (named for the first Black police chief of Tallulah, Zelma Wyche) are the sprawling ruins of Reuben McCall High School, which was the Black high school in Tallulah prior to integration. But integration never really happened in Tallulah. Although the town had barely 10,000 people, the decision was made to keep both Tallulah High School (the former white high school) and McCall High School open, with students having the right to choose either. Of course no white children chose to go to McCall, and only a handful of Blacks chose to go to Tallulah High at first. But any integration was too much for a number of whites in Tallulah, and the majority of white students soon left the public schools for Tallulah Academy. Eventually both public high schools were majority-Black. By 2005, the Madison Parish School Board could no longer keep them both open. For one thing, both campuses needed replacing, and for another, enrollment was continuing to decline. They had already closed all-Black Thomastown High School in 2001, merging it with McCall, and decided in 2005 to close Tallulah High School and merge it with McCall to form a new school called Madison Parish High School. For one year the new school used the buildings and ground of McCall High School before moving to a new facility built along I-20 south of town. The McCall campus was abandoned, vandalized and ultimately boarded up.
Abandoned schools are not unusual in Louisiana sadly, but abandoned football stadiums are much rarer. That being said, the abandoned stadium across the street from Reuben McCall High School is a sad and haunting place indeed, with the grass and brambles growing up through the bleachers. Walking past the brick wall where McCall championships were commemorated in paint just made the whole thing that much sadder. The old scoreboard still sits at the end of one endzone, while a strangely twisted goalpost marks the other. The pressbox is open and at the mercy of the weather, and one can only imagine what the place must have been like in its heyday, with the drums booming, horns blowing and the crack of helmets hitting on the field below. Neighborhood kids could have walked to the games back then. Now the whole place lies silent and forgotten.
Highway 80 on the West End of Tallulah is known as West Green Street, and the latter was once an entertainment destination, but little remains today. The Fun House and Sportsman’s Lounge are both abandoned and long-closed, victims of a great migration of Tallulah’s Black community that has been going on since the 1950’s, seeing vast numbers leave Louisiana for the West Coast. Nearly 2,000 moved out just in the years between 2000 and 2010. Down the street closer to downtown, the Hotel Watson remains intact and in good shape, although no longer open for business as a hotel. Built in 1957, the hotel was Black-owned, a reliable place for good food or a comfortable room, and well-known entertainers often stayed there when performing or traveling in the area. Today it seems to function more as an apartment building. In other parts of the West End, a few juke joints and bars still remain. Wilmore’s Lounge and Game Room draws a crowd on weekends, and the Hole In The Wall might just be the smallest night club in the world. One wonders if it was the club Mel Waiters wrote the song about, or if the Tallulah club was named for the song.
Downtown Tallulah hasn’t fared much better than the West End. The city was once home to America’s first enclosed shopping mall, Bloom’s Arcade, but shopping and retail fled the town during the 1970’s and 1980’s. Today nearly every storefront on Snyder Street is vacant. A few have only empty facades, with the rest of the building crumbled behind the front wall. Even the venerable Tallulah Club is empty and for sale across from the Madison Parish Courthouse. One thing that hasn’t changed from my youth: the metal Christmas trees decorated with lights are still sticking up out of Brushy Bayou as if it were 1973 all over again.
Looking at so many ruins and so much abandonment left me frankly depressed. The only relief I found was in the colorfully-dressed, boisterous groups of young people that wandered most streets or rode on bikes through the otherwise drab neighborhoods. Their exuberant voices carried on the warm, Sunday afternoon breezes as they headed to parks and basketball courts. Tallulah’s greatest resource at this point might be its youth- the community turns out excellent athletes and musicians. Not only does Madison High School have one of the region’s best marching bands, the Soul Rockers of the South, but Tallulah has a number of talented rappers, rap groups and singers. But, unfortunately, the young people from Tallulah are generally already planning to leave- the Delta town with such a storied past has little future, at least not for them.

High-Quality Coffee From Monroe’s RoeLa Coffee Roasters

1339 RoeLa Coffee Roasters

Monroe, Louisiana is a coffee-challenged city, and that has always surprised me. Coffee bars have come and gone there over the years (mostly gone, sadly), and aside from a Starbucks on Forsythe Avenue with unusually-limited hours and The Daily Press convenience stores, there aren’t many options. So when I saw on Facebook that something called RoeLa Coffee Roasters had opened in downtown Monroe on DeSiard Street, I was thrilled beyond words. My exhilaration turned to bitter disappointment when I discovered that the DeSiard address is basically a roastery and is not usually open to the public (although it is sometimes open for special events). RoeLa turned out not to be a solution to Monroe’s coffee-by -the-cup crisis, but I sent a text to the company to see if there was any place to buy RoeLa coffee retail in Monroe. As it turned out, there was such a place, the former Tiger Mart convenience store at 18th and Forsythe, now called Now Save, and better yet, they were open until midnight. Whole bean coffee from a local roaster at a convenience store seemed a long-shot, but after browsing the store for a period of time, I found a bag of something called Talla Bena blend. (Talla Bena is a wide spot in the road south of Tallulah in Madison Parish). Since I wouldn’t be able to enjoy it until I got home to Memphis, I also bought a bottle of RoeLa Creola Iced Coffee, which proved to be delicious and refreshing. I made the Talla Bena blend coffee in the week after I returned home from Monroe, using my automatic pour-over machine from Bodum. The coffee had a smooth finish, with notes of caramel and chocolate, and was quite delicious. Since it is not available in any Memphis stores, I’ll have to order some more of it from their website.

RoeLa Coffee Roasters
523 DeSiard St
Monroe, LA 71201
(225) 939-2537
https://roelaroaster.com

Bayou DeSiard From The Waterfront Grill

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For many years now, the Waterfront Grill in Monroe, Louisiana has been one of my favorite restaurants, period. Obviously, the food is the main reason, but beyond the excellent cuisine is the restaurant’s beautiful view of Bayou DeSiard, the wide body of water that runs past the campus of the University of Louisiana at Monroe. Elegant homes line the bayou’s north shore, but the heavily wooded banks create an atmosphere of remote natural beauty even though it is in the middle of the city. Fishermen, water-skiers and alligators alike all enjoy the bayou, and there’s no better place to watch them than from the restaurant’s deck while enjoying a dinner of shrimp or filet mignon. For special occasions, the Waterfront Grill also has a charter boat that goes out on the bayou.